NYSE, LMT, RTN, Raytheon, Lockheed, Martin, electronic, attack, anti-ship, missile, Navy, Warfare, improvement, program, SEWIP, EA, AN/SLQ-32, AN, SLQ, AN/SLQ, Military, Aerospace, Electronics, Avionics, Intelligence, Pennwell, Defense, Technology, Airplane, Aviation, Security, System, Systems, Computing, Rugged, Aircraft Lockheed Martin, Raytheon team up to provide SEWIP electronic attack capability for U.S. Navy anti-ship missile defense - Military & Aerospace Electronics

Lockheed Martin, Raytheon team up to provide SEWIP electronic attack capability for U.S. Navy anti-ship missile defense

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 1, 2012. Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] and Raytheon Company [NYSE: RTN] are teaming to compete for a U.S. Navy contract that will upgrade the fleet’s capability to electronically attack anti-ship missiles.

Through its Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP) Block 3 upgrade, the Navy seeks to cost effectively enhance the electronic attack (EA) capability of its AN/SLQ-32 V(3)  and V(4) electronic warfare (EW) systems to counter threat technology advances.  All U.S. aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers and other warships use the AN/SLQ-32 EW system.

SEWIP Block 3 is the latest upgrade in an evolutionary succession the Navy is pursuing for its EW system. Each upgrade incrementally adds new defensive technologies and functional capabilities. A formal Navy request for proposals is anticipated later this year.


Under a $167 million contract awarded by the Navy in November 2009, Lockheed Martin is developing SEWIP Block 2, which includes passive detection capabilities for advanced threats and establishes a framework to integrate future upgrades. The Navy approved the Block 2 solution during a Critical Design Review in February 2011, and two engineering development models are undergoing integration and testing at Lockheed Martin’s new EW systems test facility in Syracuse, N.Y.

Developed by Raytheon in the 1970s, the original AN/SLQ-32 systems employed passive radar technology for early warning, identification and tracking of enemy threats. Subsequent upgrades provided an additional active capability for simultaneous jamming of multiple threats.


Easily post a comment below using your Linkedin, Twitter, Google or Facebook account.


Military & Aerospace Photos

Most Popular Articles

Wire News provided by   

social activity

Webcasts

Meeting the Gen3 backplane challenge with OpenVPX and COTS

Tight Pentagon budgets mean military systems must stay in the field for longer than ever before. This doesn't mean obsolete technology, however. Today's military electronics are being upgraded constantly, an...
Sponsored by:

Digital signal processing for signals intelligence and electronic warfare

Military & Aerospace Electronics presents an expert Webcast on the design considerations for blending general-purposes processors (GPUs), general-purpose graphics processors (GPGPUs), field-programmable ...
Sponsored by:

Advantages of Intel Architecture Products and Wind River Solutions in Military & Aerospace Applications

This webinar explains the individual advantages of the Intel Architecture hardware, available for long-life supply, and the WRS software portfolio.  There are extraordinary advantages of combining such ...
Sponsored by:

All Access Sponsors

View the 2014 Buyer's Guide Now!


Mil & Aero Magazine

September 2014
Volume 25, Issue 9
file

Download Our Apps



iPhone

iPad

Android

Follow Us On...



Newsletters

Military & Aerospace Electronics

Weekly newsletter covering technical content, breaking news and product information
SUBSCRIBE

Defense Executive

Monthly newsletter covering business news and strategic insights for executive managers
SUBSCRIBE

Embedded Computing Report

Monthly newsletter covering news on embedded computing in aerospace, defense and industrial-rugged applications
SUBSCRIBE

Unmanned Vehicles

Monthly newsletter covering news updates for designers of unmanned vehicles
SUBSCRIBE