Raytheon completes tests of the HARM control section modification upgrade

TUCSON, Ariz., 7 Sept. 2012. Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) has completed testing of high-speed anti-radiation Missile (HARM) upgrades, which make the missile more precise and accurate, while reducing collateral damage.

HARM is designed to suppress or destroy surface-to-air missile radars, early warning radars and radar-directed air defense artillery systems. The upgrade, named the HARM control section modification (HCSM), adds a GPS receiver and an improved inertial measurement unit (IMU) for precision navigation. HCSM also features a digital flight computer that merges targeting solutions from navigation and seeker systems. The enhancements improve the probability of hit, while controlling where the missile can and cannot fly. HCSM improves HARM's anti-radar capability to defeat counter-HARM tactics, while reducing the risk of fratricide and collateral damage.

The HCSM effort is an ongoing U.S. Air Force-led competition between two contractors, with a down-select scheduled in 2012 for full rate production.

As part of the Air Force competition, Raytheon completed two flight tests of HCSM-modified HARMs. During an April 12, 2012, test, an F-16 aircraft fired a HCSM variant against an emitter that shut down, while a similar threat outside the designated missile impact zone threatened to lure the missile off target. The missile rejected the lure and was guided to its primary target. During a May 3 test, an HCSM-enhanced HARM that was fired from an F-16 used GPS coordinates to engage with a simulated time-critical target.

The AGM-88 HARM is used to suppress or destroy surface-to-air missile radars, early warning radars, and radar-directed air defense artillery systems. The missile is used by eight countries, and more than 4,000 have been used to date.


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