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Pentagon to boost anti-tank missile power of Indonesia and Oman with proposed Javelin sale

WASHINGTON, 21 Nov. 2012. Pentagon leaders are considering boosting the anti-armor power of the governments of Indonesia and Oman with a proposed deal to transfer 580 Javelin anti-tank missiles to the two countries worth a cumulative $156 million.

Javelin, made by Raytheon Co. and Lockheed Martin Corp., is an infantry fire-and-forget missile with lock-on before launch and automatic self-guidance designed to destroy main battle tanks, armored personnel carriers, and other armored combat vehicles. The missile also is effective against buildings and enemy helicopters.

Officials of the Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) in Washington have notified Congress of possible foreign military sales to the government of Indonesia for 180 Block I Javelin missiles, and to the government of Oman for 400 Javelin missiles.

The sale to Indonesia would be worth $60 million, and the sale to Oman would be worth $96 million, DSCA officials say.

In addition to the 180 Javelin missiles, Indonesia is asking for 25 command launch units (CLU), missile simulation rounds (MSR), battery coolant units (BCU), enhanced basic skills trainer, weapon effects simulator, batteries, battery chargers, spare parts, and support equipment.

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Oman is asking for Javelin weapon effects simulator (JAVWES), containers, spare and repair parts, support equipment, personnel training, and training equipment, in addition to 400 Javelin missiles.

The proposed sales would contribute to U.S. national security and foreign policy by helping to improve the security of friendly countries that are important forces in the political stability of the Middle East and Southeast Asia, DSCA officials say.

Indonesia will use the Javelin missiles to deter potential threats and modernize the Indonesia army. Oman will use the missiles to improve security for the country's critical oil and natural gas infrastructure and strengthen its homeland defense. Neither country will have difficulty absorbing these missiles into its armed forces, DSCA officials say.

Javelin is a fire-and-forget missile with lock-on before launch and automatic self-guidance that attacks the vulnerable tops of armored vehicles. The missile has an imaging infrared seeker and two shaped-charge warheads. A two-person infantry team typically carries the missile.

For more information contact the DSCA online at www.dsca.osd.mil, Raytheon at www.raytheon.com/capabilities/products/javelin, or Lockheed Martin at www.lockheedmartin.com/us/products/Javelin.


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