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Webcast 14 Dec. to help microelectronics industry chart course for meeting DNA-marking mandate

NASHUA, N.H., 11 Dec. 2012. The government's DNA-marking mandate for electronic parts has been called expensive, confusing, and questionably effective, yet is the law of the land. A panel of industry experts will give on how to follow the mandate's guidelines, and chart a course for what suppliers can expect in the future during a Webcast at 1 p.m. this Friday, 14 Dec. 2012, sponsored by Military & Aerospace Electronics.

Learn what the Defense Logistics Agency's DNA-marking mandate means for microelectronics suppliers to the U.S. Defense Logistics Agency. As of 15 Nov. 2012, the DLA mandates that electronic parts that DLA buys must have DNA-based marking to help prevent counterfeit parts from entering the U.S. military supply chain.

The Webcast is entitled "DNA marking controversy, and what it means for military semiconductor suppliers." Register for this pay-per-view Webcast online at www.militaryaerospace.com/webcasts/2012/12/dna-marking-controversy.

Dale Lillard, president of aftermarket supplier Lansdale Semiconductor in Phoenix, as well as Lee Mathieson, operations manager at Lansdale Semiconductor will join George Karalias, marketing communications director at aftermarket supplier Rochester Electronics in Newburyport, Mass., to tell attendees what they face with this new mandate.

Joining the panel will be Brent Rhoton, customer quality engineering manager at the Texas Instruments Semiconductor Group in Sherman Texas, to help microelectronics suppliers understand which companies are affected, and how the mandate might evolve in the future.

Military & Aerospace Electronics Chief Editor John Keller will analyze initial response from the semiconductor industry from organizations such as the Semiconductor Industry Association and the JEDEC Solid State Technology Association.

Related stories

-- Pentagon stirs up semiconductor industry with its requirement to mark parts with unique DNA

-- The DNA Marking Controversy

-- Applied DNA Sciences announces industry contracts for DNA marking of electronics; compliance with DLA mandate.

The SIA has told government officials that the DNA-marking mandate is not the appropriate cure for the counterfeit problem; that the mandated technology not only does not adequate authenticate counterfeit legacy semiconductor products, but also has not been adequately tested; and will greatly increate semiconductor manufacturing costs.

The JEDEC J-13 committee, which confers with the government regarding industry microelectronics standards, has created a task group to look into DNA marking of microcircuits.

The JEDEC task group will determine if the use of DNA marking of integrated circuits, hybrid microcircuits, and discrete semiconductors can be implemented effectively by manufacturers and their authorized distributors.

The DNA marking controversy, and what it means for military semiconductor suppliers will address the most pressing issues and help microelectronics suppliers to the U.S. Department of Defense make the transition to the DNA mandate's guidelines.

Register for the Webcast, scheduled for 1 p.m. on 14 Dec., online at www.militaryaerospace.com/webcasts/2012/12/dna-marking-controversy.

Too busy to attend Friday? Not to worry. The DNA marking controversy, and what it means for military semiconductor suppliers Webcast will be available on-demand within 24 hours of the Webcast's presentation.

For more information contact Military & Aerospace Electronics online at www.militaryaerospace.com.


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