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  1. Smart munitions to track and kill sources of RF jamming

    EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla.- The U.S. Air Force is developing special versions of two smart munitions that track and attack sources of electronic warfare (EW) jamming directed to throw the weapons off from their intended targets. Officials of the Air Force Research Laboratory at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., have announced a $9.8 million contract to Scientific Applications & Research Associates Inc. (SARA) in Cypress, Calif., for a Home-on-Jam demonstration of smart weapons already in the Air Force inventory. Researchers are developing a new warhead for the Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM), shown above, that homes-in on RF jammers. The weapons involved in the demonstration are the GPU-31 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) and the GBU-39 Small-Diameter Bomb (SDB). SARA engineers will integrate the company's Home-on-Jam seeker into the JDAM and SDB-I smart munitions. The goal is to support government-conducted flight tests to demonstrate the precision accuracy guidance capability against radio frequency threat targets in realistic conditions. The JDAM and SDB smart munitions use radio waves to guide the weapons to their targets, which an enemy can jam to prevent the munitions from hitting their intended targets. JDAM uses the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite-navigation system, while the SDB uses radar as well as electro-optical sensors for precision guidance. In the presence of jamming, however, a Home-on-Jam seeker would follow the source of the RF jamming either to destroy the jammer or force an enemy to turn the jamming system off. Home-on-Jam systems work in a similar way to the U.S. High-Speed Anti-Radiation Missile (HARM), which is designed to destroy enemy radar sites by homing in on the radar's RF emissions. Home-on-Jam capability already is integrated on other weapons like the U.S. Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM), which can home in directly on sources of radar jamming if the jamming is too powerful to allow the missiles to find and track their targets normally. Home-on-Jam weapons use enemy jammers as beacons that announce the presence and location of the hostile transmitter. The JDAM is a guidance kit that converts unguided dumb bombs into all-weather smart munitions with an inertial guidance system coupled to a GPS receiver. JDAM-equipped bombs have explosive payloads ranging from 500 to 2,000 pounds. The SDB is a 250-pound precision-guided glide bomb that adds a tri-mode radar, infrared, and semi active laser seeker to the munition's original inertial and GPS guidance that works similarly to the JDAM. The SDB is intended to enable U.S. combat aircraft carry a higher number of bombs. SARA engineers previously have worked with the Air Force Research Lab to develop the Geolocation on GPS Jammers (GOGJ) system to locate GPS jammers with a low-cost solution. SARA's GOGJ system detects and precisely 3D geolocates several GPS jammers without prior knowledge of the threat and reports their locations to users on a map display. The GOGJ seeker technology has been rendered into a flight-tested prototype for a home-on-GPS jammer mission. On this contract, SARA will do the work at White Sands Missile Range, N.M., and should be finished by October 2016. FOR MORE INFORMATION visit SARA online at www.sara.com , or the Air Force Research Lab at www.wpafb.af.mil/AFRL .

    Magazine Articles

    Magazine Articles

    Thu, 18 Dec 2014

  2. SWATs, SWEATERs, and ANSWERs: Air Force gets serious about spectrum warfare

    THE MIL & AERO BLOG, 18 Nov. 2014. Three new military technology research programs are showing us two things. First, the term "spectrum warfare" is evolving quickly well-understood mainstream usage, and second, spectrum warfare rapidly is taking its place as a top U.S. military priority.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 18 Nov 2014

  3. Air Force to enable smart weapons to track and kill sources of electronic warfare (EW) jamming

    EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla., 13 Nov. 2014. The U.S. Air Force is developing special versions of two smart munitions that track and attack sources of electronic warfare (EW) jamming directed to throw the weapons off from their intended targets.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 13 Nov 2014

  4. Army revisits troposcatter communications technology as alternative to long-range SATCOM

    U.S. Army researchers are reaching out to industry for fresh ideas on tropospheric scatter (troposcatter) technologies for fixed-site and on-the-move, long-range military communications as an alternative to satellite communications (SATCOM).

    Magazine Articles

    Magazine Articles

    Mon, 9 Sep 2013

  1. Air Force picks Raytheon and Northrop Grumman to attack costs and complexity of AESA radar

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 5 Jun 2014

  2. Raytheon and Northrop Grumman to attack costs and complexity of AESA radar

    Two of the nation's leading military radar houses are trying to develop new manufacturing processes for active phased array military radar to increase system reliability while reducing development time and costs.

    Magazine Articles

    Magazine Articles

    Tue, 8 Jul 2014

  3. Navy uses UAV data to improve performance and stealth qualities of communications and radar

    U.S. Navy researchers are using small, ship-launched unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to gather ocean and atmospheric data necessary to improve the performance and stealth qualities of maritime communications, radar, and other crucial RF and microwave technologies.

    Magazine Articles

    Magazine Articles

    Mon, 9 Sep 2013

  4. Air Force considering AESA radar upgrades for B-1 and B-52 strategic bomber fleets

    WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB, Ohio, 11 March 2014. U.S. Air Force bomber experts are considering upgrading the Air Force fleet of B-1 Lancer and B-52 Stratofortress long-range jet bombers with active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar systems to improve bomber surveillance and targeting capability.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 11 Mar 2014

  5. Air Force officials select Ball Aerospace to develop Ion Velocity Meter to fly on microsatellite

    BOULDER, Colo., 15 Feb. 2014. Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. won a $5.8 million contract from the Defense Weather System Directorate at the Space and Missile Systems Center in Los Angeles, Calif., for the production of the Ion Velocity Meter (IVM) under the U.S. Air Force Space Situational ...

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Sat, 15 Feb 2014

  6. Satellite communications becoming small, mobile, and available to warfighters on the front lines

    SPECIAL REPORT, 31 July 2012. Satellite communications (SATCOM) technology is forging ahead, thanks to evolving technology and a sudden increase in interest. Satellite communications are becoming higher-bandwidth, more secure and man-packable.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 31 Jul 2012

  7. Army revisits troposcatter communications technology as alternative to long-range SATCOM

    ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md., 26 July 2013. U.S. Army researchers are reaching out to industry for fresh ideas on tropospheric scatter (troposcatter) technologies for fixed-site and on-the-move long-range communications as an alternative to satellite communications (SATCOM).

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Fri, 26 Jul 2013

  8. Air Force scours industry for replacement part to nuclear bomber communications system

    TINKER AIR FORCE BASE, Okla., 12 March 2013. U.S. Air Force aircraft communications experts are scouring industry to find companies able to build replacements for the obsolete CU-2421 antenna coupler for the AN/ARC-211 HF radio that Rockwell Collins in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, designed for the B-2 ...

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 12 Mar 2013

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