BAE Systems unveils advanced vehicle power-management system at U.S. Army Symposium

BAE Systems introduced an advanced power-management system designed to deliver the ability to generate electric power within military tactical wheeled vehicles.

Th 0704mae News11

By Courtney E. Howard

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - BAE Systems introduced an advanced power-management system designed to deliver the ability to generate electric power within military tactical wheeled vehicles.

A prototype of the system was demonstrated on a high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV) during the Association of the U.S. Army (AUSA) Winter Symposium and Exhibition in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. BAE Systems representatives demonstrated the power system’s ability to generate electricity sufficient to operate electronic warfare, situational awareness, communications, and vehicle prognostics and diagnostics subsystems.

The demonstrator vehicle at the AUSA event was outfitted with various components requiring electric power, including a multiband antenna; a radio based on rapidly reconfigurable technology; a Check-6 infrared camera system; and prognostic and diagnostic vehicle sensors.

Th 0704mae News11
BAE Systems’s power-management system for military vehicles, shown on a U.S. Army HMMWV, combines a generator, electrified cooling system, and various power-conditioning electronics.
Click here to enlarge image

“The theme of this vehicle is power, and increased power means increased mission capability,” says Hank McGlynn, vice president of Vehicle Systems for BAE Systems in Johnson City, N.Y.

In addition to powering self-defense, weapon, countermeasures, and route-clearing systems, the solution supports the use of electrified automotive accessory systems-such as water and power-steering pumps and engine fans-that in the past have been belt-driven.

The power-management system utilizes a 45-kilowatt, liquid-cooled, permanent-magnet generator to achieve up to 400 amps of 28-volt DC electric power, while operating the HMMWV at low engine speeds. At high engine speeds, such as above 2100 revolutions per minute, an optional AC exportable power inverter can produce 30 kilowatts of 208-volt AC power.

More information about BAE Systems and its advanced power- management systems is available online at www.baesystems.com.

More in Communications