Navy orders another F-18 training system from L-3

NEW YORK, N.Y., 18 January 2005. L-3 Communications today announced that the U.S. Navy has formally accepted its F/A-18C Distributed Mission Training (DMT) system, marking the introduction of the service's first four-ship, full fidelity training system to enable Hornet pilots to train as a tactical team.

NEW YORK, N.Y., 18 January 2005. L-3 Communications today announced that the U.S. Navy has formally accepted its F/A-18C Distributed Mission Training (DMT) system, marking the introduction of the service's first four-ship, full fidelity training system to enable Hornet pilots to train as a tactical team.

The F/A-18C DMT, built by L-3 Communications' Link Simulation and Training (Link) division, is being used to train Hornet aircrews at Naval Air Station Oceana, Va. Link is under contract to deliver a second F/A-18C DMT to Naval Air Station Lemoore, Calif., in September 2005.

The F/A-18C DMT is part of the Navy Aviation Simulation Master Plan that calls for all of the service's assets that operate in the air, on land and at sea to train in a fully integrated, synthetic battlespace. The training system consists of briefing and debriefing rooms, four F/A-18C Tactical Operational Flight Trainers (TOFTs) and a mission operations center.

This highly realistic training system integrates real-world mission planning systems to support strike team mission briefs. The strike team then moves to four networked TOFTs, which can be operated to support stand-alone or multi-ship training. Personnel in the mission operations center are able to oversee and control the networked training event. Once the mission comes to a close, Hornet pilots review mission event data captured during their flight to analyze team tactical performance.

The four high-fidelity F/A-18C TOFTs are integrated with Link's personal computer image generation system, SimuView, to provide out-the-window and cockpit sensor imagery. The out-the-window imagery is projected onto Link's SimuSphere visual display system, providing a fully immersive, 360-degree synthetic combat environment.

"Link is proud to provide the Navy with this transformational aircrew training system, which will support the Navy's goal to provide distributed training to Hornet aircrews in preparation for multi-unit, joint and coalition operations," said John McNellis, president of Link Simulation and Training. "The F/A-18C DMT is the result of the collective commitment of the Navy and Link to provide a state-of-the-art training system that incorporates today's most advanced simulation technology solutions."

"This extraordinary partnership with L-3 and Strike Fighter Wing Atlantic has allowed us to significantly increase the fidelity of training provided to the warfighter while lowering both acquisition and support costs and improving historical production times by nearly 50 percent," said Capt. Larry Howard, program manager for training systems at Naval Air Systems Command. "We're looking forward to continued success with Link and our other industry partners."

Link Simulation and Training, which is celebrating its 75th anniversary, is a systems integration organization that delivers and supports training systems and equipment designed to enhance operational proficiency. Link's services include conducting front end analysis, program design, simulator design and production and field support. Link has its headquarters operation in Arlington, Texas, and other key bases of operation in Binghamton, N.Y.; Orlando, Fla.; Broken Arrow, Okla. and Phoenix, Ariz.

Headquartered in New York City, L-3 Communications is a leading provider of Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) systems, secure communications systems, aircraft modernization, training and government services and is a merchant supplier of a broad array of high technology products. Its customers include the Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security, selected U.S. Government intelligence agencies and aerospace prime contractors. For more information, see www.L-3Com.com.

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