Direction-finding antenna from SwRI helps identify and locate communications signals from moving vehicles

SAN ANTONIO, Texas, 13 May 2010. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio, Texas, is introducing the AVM-375 low-profile military antenna to identify and locate sources of communications signals from a vehicle-mounted direction finding system on the move.

May 13th, 2010
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SAN ANTONIO, Texas, 13 May 2010. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio, Texas, is introducing the AVM-375 low-profile direction-finding military antenna to identify and locate sources of communications signals from a vehicle-mounted direction finding system on the move.

This system consists of four antennas distributed around the body of a vehicle to reduce the visible signature of the military antenna array. The antenna provides real-time, 360-degree direction finding across two frequency bands, covering 120 MHz to 3 GHz.

“Most DF antennas are mounted on an extended mast to avoid signal perturbations associated with rooftop clutter; however, this creates a more obvious target for enemy threats and limits vehicle mobility,” says Patrick Siemsen, a principal engineer in SwRI’s signal exploitation and geolocation division.

“The AVM-375 improves mission stealth and vehicle mobility while providing geolocation of enemy forces from a single moving platform," Siemsen says. "Multiple platforms can be networked to provide enhanced DF and geolocation.”

The direction-finding system is calibrated using a test target and GPS tracking software, and the calibration data can be ported to systems installed on similar vehicles without requiring recalibration. For more information contact SwRI online at www.swri.org.

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