Scientists in Hong Kong have found a way to improve the memory efficiency of quantum computing

HONG KONG – A team of scientists in Hong Kong has discovered a method to boost the efficiency of photonic quantum memories to over 85 percent with a fidelity of over 99 percent. Asian Scientist reports.

May 13th, 2019
Scientists in Hong Kong have found a way to improve the memory efficiency of quantum computing
Scientists in Hong Kong have found a way to improve the memory efficiency of quantum computing
HONG KONG – A team of scientists in Hong Kong has discovered a method to boost the efficiency of photonic quantum memory to over 85 percent with a fidelity of over 99 percent. Asian Scientist reports. Continue reading original article

The Military & Aerospace Electronics take:

13 May 2019 -- Like memories in computers, quantum memories are essential components for quantum computers -- a new generation of data processors that obey quantum mechanics laws and can overcome the limitations of classical computers. Such quantum computers may push the boundaries of fundamental science and help create new drugs, explain cosmological mysteries or enhance accuracy of forecasts.

Quantum computers are expected to be much faster and more powerful than their traditional counterparts as information is calculated in quantum bits -- or qubits -- which can represent both 0 and 1 at the same time, unlike the bits of traditional computers. However, the production of highly efficient quantum memories remains a major challenge as it requires a perfectly matched photon-matter quantum interface.

In the present quantum computing study, researchers led by Professors Du Shengwang and William Mong at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology created a quantum memory device by trapping billions of rubidium atoms into a hair-like tiny space.

Related: From theory to reality: quantum computing enters the defense industry

Related: Army launches program to advance quantum computing techniques for parallel processing

Related: Raytheon BBN Technologies to research quantum computing

John Keller, chief editor
Military & Aerospace Electronics

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