Rockwell Collins SecureOne runs on Wind River VxWorks MILS platform, achieving cross-domain, multilevel security on a single aircraft display for reduced SWaP

BALTIMORE, Md., 8 Nov. 2011. Engineers at Rockwell Collins, a provider of communication and aviation electronics for military and commercial customers, needed a secure software platform on which to build its latest technology. They found their solution at Wind River, a developer of embedded and mobile software in Alameda, Calif. Rockwell Collins engineers selected Wind River’s VxWorks MILS Platform to aid development of the company’s SecureOne Processor and SecureOne Guard, two of five cross-domain, high-assurance technology building blocks for military tactical systems.

Posted by Courtney E. Howard
Posted by Courtney E. Howard

BALTIMORE, Md., 8 Nov. 2011. Engineers at Rockwell Collins, a provider of communication and aviation electronics for military and commercial customers, needed a secure software platform on which to build its latest technology. They found their solution at Wind River, a developer of embedded and mobile software in Alameda, Calif. Rockwell Collins engineers selected Wind River’s VxWorks MILS Platform to aid development of the company’s SecureOne Processor and SecureOne Guard, two of five cross-domain, high-assurance technology building blocks for military tactical systems.

VxWorks MILS Platform, part of Wind River’s VxWorks real-time operating system (RTOS) product portfolio, enables software development of multilevel secure (MLS) systems and cross-domain solution products on a shared computing platform, describes a representative.

SecureOne cross-domain technologies are designed to ensure the secure processing, communication, display, and storage of data at different classification levels, without the need for physically separate equipment to protect and secure classified data. The user has access to unclassified and classified data on the same display, which provides enhanced situational awareness and reduced user workload, while reducing size, weight, and power (SWaP) on the aircraft.

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