Rochester Electronics expands products and manufacturing for radiation-hardened space-level semiconductors

NEWBURYPORT, Mass., 18 Nov. 2010. Aftermarket electronics components specialist Rochester Electronics in Newburyport, Mass., is expanding the company's space-level radiation-hardened products and manufacturing services. Contractually licensed by more than 60 original manufacturers, Rochester has more than two million space-level semiconductor devices in stock, and is licensed to manufacture rad-hard space products from National Semiconductor, Texas Instruments, Fairchild, and others.

Nov 18th, 2010
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NEWBURYPORT, Mass., 18 Nov. 2010.Aftermarket electronics components specialist Rochester Electronics in Newburyport, Mass., is expanding the company's space-level radiation-hardened products and manufacturing services. Contractually licensed by more than 60 original manufacturers, Rochester has more than two million space-level semiconductor devices in stock, and is licensed to manufacture rad-hard space products from National Semiconductor, Texas Instruments, Fairchild, and others.

Many manufacturers are discontinuing production of space-level parts because of certification and infrastructure issues, leaving designers with few places to turn for authorized space-level parts, Rochester officials say.

Rochester’s semiconductor re-creation and manufacturing is an alternative to system re-design when critical semiconductors are no longer available from the original manufacturer. Rochester’s re-creation process provides a replicated device that matches the original semiconductor’s physical features -- layer-by-layer and pin-for-pin -- and is guaranteed to perform exactly as the original.

As an approved member of the Class V Qualified Manufacturer List (QML) by the Defense Supply Center Columbus (DSCC), Rochester manufactures devices that meet MIL-PRF-38535 space-level certification requirements. Rochester has completed 83 semiconductor replication projects in the last 18 months and is currently engaged in more than 30 additional re-creation projects, says Paul Gerrish, co-president of Rochester Electronics.

Rochester is providing support for a part used in the James Webb Space Telescope, a large, infrared-optimized space telescope that is set to be launched in 2013. The semiconductor, which reached end-of-life, and for which there was no next-generation replacement, is built on a high-powered, bipolar process and contains a unique functional set that includes a high-power transistor array with front-end logic blocks.

For more information about the Rochester Electronics space-level products, contact Rochester online at www.rocelec.com.

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