U.S. Army awards two contracts to BAE Systems for day/night, all-weather thermal weapon sights

LEXINGTON, Mass., 21 Jan. 2007. BAE Systems has received two U.S. Army orders totaling $80 million for production of thermal weapon sights. The orders expedite production to meet Army fielding requirements and exercise remaining options under a five-year contract that calls for 29,000 of the day/night, all-weather sights. The Army also awarded BAE Systems funding for advanced technology development that will continue to reduce the size, weight, and cost of future weapon sights.

LEXINGTON, Mass., 21 Jan. 2007. BAE Systems has received two U.S. Army orders totaling $80 million for production of thermal weapon sights. The orders expedite production to meet Army fielding requirements and exercise remaining options under a five-year contract that calls for 29,000 of the day/night, all-weather sights.

The Army also awarded BAE Systems funding for advanced technology development that will continue to reduce the size, weight, and cost of future weapon sights.

The company received a $35 million modification to its Thermal Weapon Sight II (TWS II) contract to accelerate deliveries to meet Army requirements driven by the global war on terrorism. Separately, it received a $45 million order, also under the TWS II effort, to exercise all remaining base and option quantities on the five-year contract, originally awarded in March 2004.

The two awards bring the total value of the TWS II contract to $285 million. To date, the company has delivered more than 4,500 of the 29,000 weapon sights. The contract is managed by the Army's Program Executive Office-Soldier at Fort Belvoir, Va., and administered by the Army Communications-Electronics Command at Fort Monmouth, N.J.

"These weapon sights provide Army infantry with the ability to detect and engage targets day or night, in all weather and battlefield conditions," says Bruce Zukauskas, director of military programs for BAE Systems in Lexington, Mass. "We are committed to accelerating production of this vitally important equipment in support of our troops."

Separately, the Army selected BAE Systems to continue development of advanced microbolometer technology designed to reduce the size, weight, and cost of future weapon sights. Under an Army contract awarded early in 2006, the company has partnered with the Army to demonstrate 17-micron, 640x480-pixel focal plane arrays in medium and heavy thermal weapon sights. The arrays have an active area about one-third the size of existing arrays.

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