Army orders more helicopter trainers from L-3

NEW YORK, N.Y., 10 March 2005. L-3 Communications announced today that its Link Simulation and Training (Link) division has been awarded a $27.4 million follow-on production contract to build the ninth, 10th and 11th U.S. Army Aviation Combined Arms Tactical Trainer - Aviation Reconfigurable Manned Simulator (AVCATT) suites.

Mar 11th, 2005

NEW YORK, N.Y., 10 March 2005. L-3 Communications announced today that its Link Simulation and Training (Link) division has been awarded a $27.4 million follow-on production contract to build the ninth, 10th and 11th U.S. Army Aviation Combined Arms Tactical Trainer - Aviation Reconfigurable Manned Simulator (AVCATT) suites. This award also includes spares for each suite.

Under this contract option, the ninth AVCATT suite is scheduled for delivery in January 2006, the 10th suite is slated for delivery in March 2006, and the 11th is planned for delivery in May 2006.

The Army also has approved funding for a total of 23 AVCATT trainer suites, including the 11 currently ordered or already delivered to the service and the Army National Guard. All AVCATT trainer suites are planned for delivery by 2008, assuming funding is available.

Each training suite, which is housed in two mobile 53-foot trailers, consists of six reconfigurable simulators, a battle master control room and an after-action review theater. The AVCATT simulators can be reconfigured to represent any combination of AH-64D Apache Longbow, AH-64A Apache, OH-58D Kiowa Warrior, UH-60 Black Hawk and CH-47D Chinook platforms.

During a simulated AVCATT exercise, commanders can mix and match rotary wing platforms to best support the training objective. Intelligent semi-automated forces, both friendly and opposing, populate the virtual battlefield and contribute to combat realism. Realistic visual, infrared and radio frequency clutter, communications degradation and a variety of adverse weather conditions enhance the challenges of the simulated battlefield environment.

AVCATT's battle master control station, which is home to the battle master, training unit observer controller, semi-automated force controller and role players, provides the capability to monitor and record each unit's performance during a mission. The battle master can see and hear everything taking place on the battlefield by viewing displays that provide situational awareness, a god's-eye-view of the combat area from any perspective and a selectable sensor panel to allow observation through any simulated helicopter's sensor systems. Four role player stations in the battle master control room enable designated individuals to serve as artillery, joint air support, ground, engineer or logistics force commanders by employing semi-automated force entities that maintain close cooperative interactions with AVCATT aircrews.

When a mission is completed, the recorded data and video is presented in the after-action review theater, where the observer controller conducts a mission debrief with the aircrews to review the unit's performance and determine which skills or tactics need to be further honed. The after-action review theater can also be used to view the conduct of training in progress, if desired.

"The AVCATT training system is proving its value every day to the U.S. Army and U.S. Army National Guard by providing highly realistic collective training in a joint and combined arms environment that is significantly raising the warfighting readiness levels of soldiers, leaders and unit staffs," said Lenny Genna, vice president of U.S. Army programs for Link Simulation and Training. "The networked capability of AVCATT training suites and interoperability with the U.S. Army's Close Combat Tactical Trainer system, the service's currently fielded mechanized and armor training system, provides U.S. Army leaders a unique opportunity for an unprecedented level of realism during simulated operations."

Link Simulation and Training, which is celebrating its 75th anniversary, is a systems integration organization that delivers and supports training systems and equipment to enhance operational proficiency. Link's services include conducting front-end analysis, program design, simulator design and production and field support. Link has major operations in Arlington, Texas, and other key bases of operation in Binghamton, N.Y.; Orlando, Fla.; Broken Arrow, Okla. and Phoenix, Ariz.

Headquartered in New York City, L-3 Communications is a leading provider of Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) systems, secure communications systems, aircraft modernization, training and government services and is a merchant supplier of a broad array of high technology products. Its customers include the Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security, selected U.S. Government intelligence agencies and aerospace prime contractors. For more information, see www.L-3Com.com.

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