Rugged wearable computer with GPS and tactical radio interface for situational awareness introduced by GD Itronix

SUNRISE, Fla., 2 Aug. 2010. Rugged computer specialist General Dynamics Itronix in Sunrise, Fla., is introducing the GD300 wearable computer that combines satellite navigation, data communications, and battlefield-rugged computing to enhance situational awareness for the foot soldier. The GD300 has a sensitive commercial global positioning system (GPS), ARM Cortex A8 microprocessor, Android operating system, 3.5-inch sunlight-readable color display, and radio interface kit into an 8-ounce package that infantrymen can wear on their wrists or chests, or carry in pockets of their battlefield gear.

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SUNRISE, Fla., 2 Aug. 2010.Rugged computer specialist General Dynamics Itronix in Sunrise, Fla., is introducing the GD300 wearable computer that combines satellite navigation, data communications, and battlefield-rugged computing to enhance situational awareness for the foot soldier.

The GD300 has a sensitive commercial global positioning system (GPS), ARM Cortex A8 microprocessor, Android operating system, 3.5-inch color sunlight-readable display, and radio interface kit into an 8-ounce package that infantrymen can wear on their wrists or chests, or carry in pockets of their battlefield gear.

The radio interface kit enables users to connect the computer with tactical radios like the AN/PRC-154 Rifleman Radio, which is a software-defined radio system that complies with the U.S. military's Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS) architecture.

Once the GD300 is connected to a tactical radio, the user can exchange text, imagery, and other data with others on the battlefield, as well as gain access to the Tactical Internet to access streaming video from unmanned aerial vehicles and other intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) assets.

The radio interface kit docks onto the bottom of the GD300 wearable computer. "As radio networks change, the computer does not have to be replaced," Jacob explains. "You can just modify the radio interface kit itself."

The Android operating system enables the GD300 to add and delete commercial and military software programs, including the Tactical Ground Reporting System (TIGR) Web-based information management application from General Dynamics C4 Systems in Fairfax, Va.

In addition to the sunlight-readable display, the GD300 also has a night-vision applique so that users can read the screen at night while wearing night-vision goggles, explains Jason Jacob, product manager of the GD300 at General Dynamics Itronix.

"The screen is a regular transmissive display that uses a resistive touch screen designed with gloved fingers in mind," Jacob says. "This is fully rugged and lightweight, and there are not a lot of devices out there that are only half a pound and still fully rugged."

For more information contact General Dynamics Itronix online at www.gd-itronix.com.

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