Northrop Grumman Integrated Systems adopts Themis Quorum automated management software

Northrop Grumman Integrated Systems in El Segundo, Calif., has included Quorum from Themis Computer in Fremont, Calif., in the company’s battle- management command-and-control (BMC2) subsystem proposal.

Apr 1st, 2007
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Northrop Grumman Integrated Systems in El Segundo, Calif., has included Quorum from Themis Computer in Fremont, Calif., in the company’s battle- management command-and-control (BMC2) subsystem proposal.

The BMC2 subsystem includes a computing architecture with systems that store, manipulate, and exploit data received from multiple intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) assets in the Air Force’s planned Command and Control Constellation.

By collecting and converting incoming sensor data into decision-quality information for Air Force commanders, the BMC2 subsystem provides a visual representation of a dynamic, three-dimensional battlespace. This information aids commanders in positioning ISR and strike platforms in the theater; identifying, tracking, and targeting incoming cruise missiles; and issuing strikes against ground moving targets.

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The BMC2 team, led by the Integrated Systems division of Northrop Grumman, also includes Harris Corp. in Melbourne, Fla.; General Dynamics in Scottsdale, Ariz.; Cisco Systems in San Jose, Calif.; Oracle Corp. in Redwood City, Calif.; Zel Technologies in Hampton, Va.; Alphatech, owned by BAE Systems, in Burlington, Mass.; L-3 Communication Systems West in Salt Lake City; L-3 ComCept in Rockwall, Texas; and CollaborX in Colorado Springs, Colo. Northrop Grumman’s Electronic Systems (Linthicum Heights, Md.), Information Technology (McLean, Va.), Mission Systems (Reston, Va.), and Space Technology (Redondo Beach, Calif.) sectors also make up the BMC2 team.

Themis’s Quorum, a distributed-computing resource-management system, automates the management of service-level agreements, applications, and hardware resources in real-time, mission-critical distributed systems. Quorum’s real-time policy engine can detect a problem and implement a solution, in as short a time as 50 milliseconds, according to a company representative.

“Our Quorum real-time resource-management system was designed for the demands of mission-critical computing in military environments,” says William E. Kehret, president of Themis Computer. “Northrop Grumman selected Quorum because it is an open-architecture, real-time, policy-based solution that satisfies the program requirements.”

More information about Themis Computer and Northrop Grumman is available online at www.themis.com and www.northropgrumman.com, respectively.

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