Analog Devices offers memory-based DSP for real-time systems

Engineers at Analog Devices Inc. of Norwood, Mass., are offering a family of flash memory-based embedded digital signal processors (DSPs) called DashDSP. These devices integrate signal conversion, signal processing, and memory onto one 28-pin chip

Apr 1st, 2000

Engineers at Analog Devices Inc. of Norwood, Mass., are offering a family of flash memory-based embedded digital signal processors (DSPs) called DashDSP. These devices integrate signal conversion, signal processing, and memory onto one 28-pin chip. Company officials say the device eases digital control and flash memory design while eliminating the complexity of analog interfacing. The devices aim at precise motor control. For more information contact the Analog Devices Embedded

Control systems Group by phone at 781-937-1799, by fax at 781-937-1707, by post at P.O. Box 9106, Norwood, Mass. 02062-9106, or on the World Wide Web a http://www.analog.com/ - J.K.

Radar market heats up - particularly in Latin America and Asia

Demand for land-based surveillance radar will grow through 2008, says market researcher Frost & Sullivan. The total worldwide market for land-based surveillance radar grew from $636 million in 1998 to $691 million in 1999, and will continue for the next eight years, according to the Frost & Sullivan study "World Military and Commercial Land-Based Surveillance Radar Markets." Helping drive demand are efforts to modernize radar in Latin America and Asia - particularly in air traffic control and weather applications, the study says. Military radar users prefer active-array radar, which is expected to dominate military radar procurement for the next five to seven years, the study says. For more information contact Frost & Sullivan by phone at 650-961-9000, by fax at 650-961-5042, by post at 2525 Charleston Road, Mountain View, Calif. 94043, or on the World Wide Web at http://www.frost.com/. - J.K.

Macrolink offers CompactPCI communications controller

Engineers at Macrolink Inc. of Anaheim, Calif., are offering their MCCR CompactPCI serial communications controller. The 6U card has eight or 16 asynchronous serial ports, supports line rates as fast as 12.5 megabits per second with a maximum aggregate throughput of 30 megabits per second full duplex. Users can configure one MCCR with any mix or RS-232, RS-422, RS-485, MIL-STD-188C, and buffered TTL in four-port groups. Integrators can install as many as four different serial line interface conditioners with as many as 10 signal lines per port. For more information contact Macrolink by phone at 714-777-8800, by fax at 714-777-8807, by post at 1500 N. Kellogg Drive, Anaheim, Calif. 92807, or on the World Wide Web at http://www.macrolink.com/. - J.K.

Night-vision yellow and red added to pushbutton display switches

Engineers at StacoSwitch in Costa Mesa, Calif., are introducing their Series 90 lighted pushbutton switches, which meet the requirements of Mil-L-85762 and MIL-S-22885/101 for sunlight readable colors NVIS yellow and NVIS red. With the addition of these colors, and with the NVIS green A and NVIS green B already available from StacoSwitch, users have a complete complement of night vision goggle-compatible configurations of lighted pushbutton switches qualified for Mil-L-85762 Type I class A or class B, and Type II class A or class B goggles, where applicable. For more information contact StacoSwitch by phone at 714-549-3041, by fax at 714-549-0930, by e-mail at sales@stacoswitch.com, by post at 1139 Baker St., Costa Mesa, Calif. 92626, or on the World Wide Web at http://www.stacoswitch.com/. - J.K.

Martek Power Abbott unveils new DC-DC converter line

Designers at Martek Power Abbott in Los Angeles are offering their NL Series line of DC-DC converters for ground-mobile and man-portable applications. The power devices have 12-volt DC input, are for high-reliability applications, and operate at temperatures from -55 to 100 degrees Celsius. The new devices, which come in 50-, 100-, and 150-watt modules, can withstand high levels of mechanical and thermal shock, Abbott officials say. They measure 0.38 inches high are available in singe, dual, and triple outputs. Standard features are remote sensors, output voltage trimming, and single-pin parallel operation. The NL series is available in military grades, which meets MIL-STD-810 for vibration and chock, acceleration, and altitude. For more information, contact Martek Power Abbott by phone at 310-202-8820, by fax at 310-836-4926, by post at 2727 South La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90034, or on the World Wide Web at http://www.martekpowerabbott.com/. - J.K.

Evans & Sutherland to supply visual simulators for Marines

U.S. Marine Corps officials are choosing Evans & Sutherland of Salt Lake City to provide visual simulation systems for the Marine Corps H-46 and H-53 helicopter, as well as the Marine Corps C-130 fixed-wing turboprop aircraft. The $3.4 million contract calls for Evans & Sutherland to provide the ESIG 5500 image generator - the company's top-of-the-line ESIG device. The Marines has been buying Evans & Sutherland simulation equipment for more than 20 years, a relationship which did influence the Marine Corps decision, Evans & Sutherland officials say. - J.K.

Computer Sciences to develop air-control data link

Systems integrators at Computer Sciences Corp. in Falls Church, Va., are designing components for the Federal Aviation Administration's future Controller Pilot Data Communications Link, better known as CPDLC. Computer Sciences, which is working under terms of an $18 million FAA contract, will build and install the en-route data link, which will generate air traffic services data and send the data via digital air-to-ground communications to supplement voice-only communications. The program supports the FAA's Free Flight Program, which gives pilots the capability to make the most of airspace and reduce delays by giving them broader freedom than they have to day to fly direct routes. Computer Sciences experts will develop software, install the systems, and provide training. Teaming with Computer Sciences is Lockheed Martin Air Traffic Management in Rockville, Md.; Aeronautical Communication International in New York; Bloodworth Integrated Technology Inc. of Reston, Va.; Certification Services Inc. in Seattle; Crown Consulting Inc. in Washington; Joseph Sheairs Associates of Egg Harbor, N.J.; and Performance Technologies International of Reston, Va. - J.K.

Power supply study plots five-year industry trends

A new report from the Power Sources Manufacturers Association (PSMA) in Mendham, N.J., describes modern AC-DC and DC-DC power conversion techniques. Entitled "Trends in Power Supply Design and Packaging," the study has two parts: the first is the state of the art in 10 various segments of the industry, and the second is a detailed evaluation of 10 AC-DC and 10 DC-DC power supplies. the first part of the study details trends in power semiconductors, control and integrated circuits, carrier systems technology, general packaging, benchmark integration, power supplies, capacitors, connectors, magnetic components, and thermal systems. The report costs $995 and is available from three sites on the World Wide Web: http://www.psma.com, http://www.powerquotes.com, and http://www.darnell.com. for more information, contact the PSMA by phone at 973-543-9660, by fax at 973-543-62-7, or by e-mail at power@psma.com/. - J.K.

Lockheed Martin wins U.K. air traffic control work

Systems designers at Lockheed Martin Corp. of Bethesda, Md., are developing the New Scottish Centre (NSC) air traffic control system at Prestwick in Ayrshire, Scotland. the $80 million contract from the United Kingdom National Air Traffic Services Ltd. (NATS) is to replace an old system and progress the NATS two-center strategy to address U.K. air traffic growth over the next two decades. When completed, the system will provide en-route air traffic control for the Scottish Flight Information Region, which covers the airspace of all Scotland and Northern Ireland, as well as interfaces for oceanic air traffic control. - J.K.

Air Force moves ahead on nuclear missile guidance upgrade

An engineering team led by the TRW Space and Missile Systems division in Redondo Beach, Calif., are beginning full-rate production on the Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile guidance replacement program - better known as GRP. TRW is doing the work under a $143.7 million U.S. Air Force contract, and is working with partners Boeing Electronic Systems & Missile Defense in Anaheim, Calif., and with the Honeywell Space Systems Division in Clearwater, Fla. Honeywell is a major subcontractor to Boeing, and is providing the GRP systems computer. GRP upgrades the Minuteman III guidance system electronics, and provides new guidance system software. - J.K.

Intersil offers rad-hard power chip

Designers at Intersil Corp. in Palm Bay, Fla., are unveiling a radiation-hardened, full-bridge, N-Channel field effect transistor driver integrated circuit for distributed DC power supplies, DC-DC converters, and motor-control applications. The HS-4080ARH is immune to single-event latchup, tests to 300 kilorads total-dose radiation, and can greatly reduce sensitivity to low-dose radiation effects, Intersil officials say. The device from Intersil - formerly Harris Semiconductor - has a drive medium-voltage motors, and is able to micro-step through a short minimum on time necessary for driving high-performance stepper motors. The parts are commercially available standard products and are potential commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) solutions for satellite systems, company officials say. The HS-4080ARH comes in a 20-pin flat pack package, and is available to Standard Microcircuit Drawing 5962-99617. For more information, contact Intersil by phone at 888-468-3774, by e-mail at centapp@Intersil.com, by post at 2401 Palm Bay Road, Palm Bay, Fla. 32905, or on the World Wide Web at http://www.intersil.com/. - J.K.

DRS to develop new infrared technology for U.S. Navy

Designers at DRS Technologies Inc. of Parsippany, N.J., are developing a 3-band infrared focal plane array detector under terms of a $1.1 million contract from the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in Washington. The sensor is for U.S. theater missile defense applications, where its multi-band sensor will enhance the missile's ability to discern armed warheads from decoys and background debris. Company officials say they believe this program and others related to it will yield some of the most sophisticated detectors in the world. - J.K.

Lockheed Martin to design aircraft carrier warfare system

Systems integrators from the Lockheed Martin Corp. Naval Electronics and Surveillance Systems division in Morristown, N.J., will design the battle-management electronics aboard the U.S. Navy's yet-unnamed CVN 77 nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. Lockheed Martin will work under supervision of the CVN 77's prime contractor, Newport News Shipbuilding of Newport News, Va. Lockheed Martin engineers will be responsible for improving the interoperability between the carrier's sensors, communications systems, aircraft control systems, armaments, and other electronics. "CVN 77 is the first step in the Navy's three-ship evolutionary strategy for developing the next class of carriers," says Irwin Edenzon, director of future carrier programs at Newport News Shipbuilding. "The CVN 77 warfare system will be the first building block the next class of carriers. Because of that, we'll work with Lockheed Martin to deliver an open-architecture, COTS-based system that will allow us to readily support and upgrade the system over its 50-year service life." - J.K.

Vishay offers high-temperature aluminum electrolytic capacitors

Experts at Vishay Intertechnology Inc. of Malvern, Pa., are introducing a new family of high-temperature aluminum electrolytic capacitors for military and automotive applications. Vishay's new capacitors, which operate in temperatures as hot as 150 degrees Celsius, are to smooth, filter, couple, and decouple circuits. The devices, called the EBH/EGH series, have useful lifetimes without derating of 1,500 hours at 150 C, 5,000 hours at 125 C, 19,000 hours at 105 C, and more than 500,000 hours - longer than 57 years - at 40 C. The devices offer a range of capacitance options from 220 micro farads to 22,000 micro farads with tolerances of plus-or-minus 20 percent. For more information, contact Vishay's Leo Dumas by phone at 704-924-5159, by fax at 704-924-9668, by post at 2100 W. Front St., Statesville, N.C. 28667, by e-mail at leo.dumas@vishay.com, or on the World Wide Web at http://www.vishay.com/. - J.K.

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