Analog Devices to supply new A-D converter for Patriot missile

Tactical missile designers from Raytheon Co. in Lexington, Mass., needed high-speed analog-to-digital (A-D) converter modules to help them upgrade electronic subsystems in the Patriot anti-missile system, and in the Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile — better known as AMRAAM.

Tactical missile designers from Raytheon Co. in Lexington, Mass., needed high-speed analog-to-digital (A-D) converter modules to help them upgrade electronic subsystems in the Patriot anti-missile system, and in the Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile — better known as AMRAAM.

They found their solution in a new development project at Analog Devices Inc. (ADI) of Norwood, Mass.

Integrated circuit designers at Analog Devices are developing a multi-channel A-D converter module for a new fuze in the Patriot. Company engineers are optimizing the A-D converter module for direct intermediate frequency (IF) sampling.

Analog Devices has built a reputation in mixed-signal systems integration, and company designers claim they can significantly reduce the number of components necessary for A-D converters, while increasing their performance.

For the AMRAAM, Analog Devices designers are optimizing an A-D converter for radar receiver in-phase quadrature demodulation, which is capable of direct IF conversion.

Patriot is one of the primary U.S. and allied weapons for destroying incoming enemy ballistic missiles. U.S. Army soldiers used Patriot with some success during the Persian Gulf War to destroy incoming Iraqi Scud ballistic missiles.

AMRAAM is today`s front-line air-to-air missile for the most advanced U.S. and allied jet fighters. AMRAAM is a radar-guided medium-range anti-aircraft missile that was the replacement for the venerable Sparrow air-to-air missile.

The experience and track record of Analog Devices chip designers was one of the primary reasons Raytheon experts chose the company, officials say.

"ADI has demonstrated a unique understanding of the critical requirements we have in the mission-critical system," says Steve Corn, a Raytheon project manager on the AMRAAM program. "Teaming with ADI for critical mixed-signal subsystem developments has directly contributed to our success on this program." — J.K.

For more information, contact the Analog Devices Transportation & Industrial Production Division by phone at 781-937-1735, by fax at 781-937-1777, by post at 831 Woburn St., Wilmington, Mass. 01887, or on the World Wide Web at http://www.analog.com/.

More in Communications