New Zealand company launches display viewable in 3-D to the naked eye

Experts at Deep Video Imaging of Hamilton, New Zealand, have designed a computer screen that shows three-dimensional images without requiring the viewer to use 3-D glasses, tracking devices, or fixed positioning.

By John McHale

HAMILTON, New Zealand — Experts at Deep Video Imaging of Hamilton, New Zealand, have designed a computer screen that shows three-dimensional images without requiring the viewer to use 3-D glasses, tracking devices, or fixed positioning.

The Actualdepth liquid crystal display (LCD) panel "has a number of military applications including terrain mapping, air traffic control, aquatic landscaping, data visualization, terrain mapping, and training applications," says Bruce Seymour, business development manager for North America at Deep Video.

Air traffic controllers will be able to access much more information on their displays through an enhanced viewing angle than then can with 2-D displays, Seymour claims. For example, users can layer radar and/or weather information on top of a schematic of the runways, he adds.

The Actualdepth technology also increases the clarity and depth of field of applications involving terrain mapping and any graphics simulation that may be appropriate for military or flight training, Seymour says.

On a 2-D terrain mapping display, labels sometimes cover up objects of importance to the viewer. For example, an altitude label can cover up a mountain, Seymour says. With the actual depth technology a viewer can move behind that label to examine the mountain from in front or behind, he explains.

The display is two LCDs combined within a proprietary process that creates the realistic 3-D viewing angle, Seymour explains. It is much like any other LCD monitor, except that it is 3-D, Seymour says. It is also rugged, but not yet sunlight readable, he adds.

The display can work with any operating system such as Windows, Linux, MAC OS, or Unix, he continues. No drivers are required; its only requirement is the use of two video outputs, Seymour explains.

Currently the company offers two models in 12- and 15-inch sizes, Seymour says. However the technology is scaleable from a cell phone screen to that of a desktop monitor and larger if the application warrants, he explains.

The Deep Video device was first introduced to potential U.S. users last April. Actualdepth was originally developed three years ago by a research and development firm called Power Beat International. Deep Video contracts with Innova of Houston to manufacture the monitors.

For more information on the Actualdepth monitors contact Bruce Seymour by phone at 860-793-9520, by fax at 860-621-1943, by e-mail at bruce@deepvideo.com, or on the World Wide Web at http://www.actualdepth.com.

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