Mortar Fire Control System (MFCS) components to come from MFCS prime EFW Inc. in $6.9 million deal

PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J., 8 May 2011. U.S. Army munitions experts needed components for the Mortar Fire-Control System (MFCS), which will provide digital control and accuracy similar to that of the M109A6 Paladin self-propelled howitzer to Army infantry soldiers firing the 120-millimeter mortar. They found their solution from EFW Inc., an Elbit Systems of America Company located in Fort Worth, Texas. Officials of the Army Contracting Command at Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., awarded a $6.9 million contract to EFW last week to provide components for the MFCS.

May 8th, 2011
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PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J., 8 May 2011. U.S. Army munitions experts needed components for the Mortar Fire-Control System (MFCS), which will provide digital fire control and accuracy similar to that of the M109A6 Paladin self-propelled howitzer to Army infantry soldiers firing the 120-millimeter mortar. They found their solution from EFW Inc., an Elbit Systems of America Company located in Fort Worth, Texas.Officials of the Army Contracting Command at Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., awarded a $6.9 million contract to EFW last week to provide components for the MFCS. Elbit Systems of America is handling all production of the Mortar Fire Control System. EFW will do the work in Fort Worth, Texas, and should be finished by early 2014.The Mortar Fire Control System determines the position and pointing angle of the 120-millimeter mortar, calculates aiming solutions digitally for accurate firing, and enables digital military communications between the mortar crew and fire-control networks that coordinate artillery, mortar, and aerial bombing to help troops on the ground.

The MFCS has components that include a commander's interface that links system components, performs ballistic calculations, and acts as a mortar ballistic computer; pointing device that enables the mortar to determine its own position; gunner's display that helps mortar crews point the tube for accurate firing; and a driver's display that helps mortar crews traveling in vehicles to drive toward targets when the crew receives a call for fire.

The idea behind the MFCS is to enable self-propelled 120-millimeter mortar crews to fire within a minute of receiving fire orders with accuracy within 200 feet at the mortar's maximum range. Digital radio networks enable the MFCS to communicate with the Army's Advanced Field Artillery Tactical Data System (AFATDS).

For more information contact EFW Inc. online at www.efw.com, or the Army's Picatinny Arsenal at www.pica.army.mil.

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