INX debuts emergency and military communications system

DALLAS, 21 March 2006. RouteStep Communications, a division of INX Inc., has unveiled its FALCoN, a Forward Area Lightweight Communications Node. The Cisco Systems-based, IP communications solution, well suited to first responders and military personnel, fits in the overhead compartment of an airplane and can be transported by a single-person.

DALLAS, 21 March 2006. RouteStep Communications, a division of INX Inc., has unveiled its FALCoN, a Forward Area Lightweight Communications Node. The Cisco Systems-based, IP communications solution, well suited to first responders and military personnel, fits in the overhead compartment of an airplane and can be transported by a single-person.

The FALCoN is designed to establish instantaneous communications almost anywhere in the world and under extreme conditions. The FALCoN uses "reach back" capabilities to bring the features of the host network to the field, including voice, video, and data applications.

"As more and more applications and communications move to the IP network, remote networking requirements and available services move from simple radio and voice to include data and video capabilities as well," says David Peoples, vice president of Federal Division for INX. "Today's first responder groups and military personnel want host network functionality in the field and the FALCoN delivers that in a lightweight and durable package."

The rugged unit is powered by Cisco Systems technology using mobile IP communications feature sets. The unit's universal power supply is designed to take power from AC and/or DC power sources.

Integrated into a rugged, injection-molded case, the FALCoN is dust-resistant, moisture-resistant, and crush resistant. Exterior MIL-SPEC Ethernet ports are included with dust-proof, moisture-proof caps.

FALCoN hardware design allows options, such as GPS, hardware encryption, and hardened PC server hardware. Custom solutions can be designed to fit individual needs, including integrating into emergency vehicles, meeting environmental requirements, and building full-scale alone mobile communication systems.

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