Air Force researchers look to Raytheon for interoperable intelligence systems technology

ROME, N.Y., 17 Nov. 2006. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Information Directorate in Rome, N.Y., awarded a $4.8 million contract to Raytheon Systems Co. of State College, Pa., to provide technology that uses the Multi-sensor Aerospace-ground Joint ISR Interoperability Coalition (MAJIIC) Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD).

Nov 17th, 2006

ROME, N.Y., 17 Nov. 2006. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Information Directorate in Rome, N.Y., awarded a $4.8 million contract to Raytheon Systems Co. of State College, Pa., to provide technology that uses the Multi-sensor Aerospace-ground Joint ISR Interoperability Coalition (MAJIIC) Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD).

MAJIIC is a five-year ACTD that began in April 2005, with the overall objective of promoting interoperability among each member nation's intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) sensor platforms and ground systems, focusing on the net-centric methodologies of sharing and using ISR data.

The 22-month agreement, with Raytheon is called Distributed Common Ground Station (DCGS) Coalition Releasable Enclave.

The participating nations of MAJIIC are Canada, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, United Kingdom, and the United States, with the NATO Command, Control, and Consultation Agency (NC3A) providing technical support to the MAJIIC project.

"This effort will address a broad range of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) data types. The interoperability of these data types will be tested and validated for military utility during annual MAJIIC coalition exercises and demonstrations, both simulated and live-fly," says John M. Vergis, program manager in the directorate's Information and Intelligence Exploitation Division.

"MAJIIC is the trailblazer for joint and coalition interoperability, providing the venue for testing and interaction with U.S. and coalition systems and military operators, all striving to achieve the common objective of maximizing all the capabilities a coalition operation can provide," Vergis says. "This will ultimately provide risk reduction and coalition interoperability for the ongoing development of future Department of Defense DCGS capabilities."

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