Army seeks to leverage laser drill technology for possible stand-off weapon use

FORT BELVOIR, Va., 8 Oct. 2007. U.S. Army researchers are canvassing U.S. industry and colleges to determine if anyone is capable of fitting a high-energy laser drill to a humvee land vehicle and using it to penetrate 8 to 12 inches into dense material from distances as far away as 320 feet.

FORT BELVOIR, Va., 8 Oct. 2007. U.S. Army researchers are canvassing U.S. industry and colleges to determine if anyone is capable of fitting a high-energy laser drill to a humvee land vehicle and using it to penetrate 8 to 12 inches into dense material from distances as far away as 320 feet.

The solicitation (W909MY-08-R-HELD), which is on behalf of the Army's Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate Science and Technology Division at Fort Belvoir, Va., makes no mention of whether Army leaders would intend to use this stand-off laser drill as a weapon.

In theory, the Army could use such a system to approach targets covertly and drill through concrete, steel, wood, or other materials from a stand-off distance equal to the length of a football field. The drill could consist of one or more laser beams.

At present, there is no clear indication of whether anyone in industry or academia might be able to fulfill the Army's request. Companies and colleges have until 19 Nov. 2007 to respond if they believe they have the ability to do this.

Companies or colleges that wish to respond should e-mail white papers to contract specialist Tina Patterson. If the submission cannot be made via e-mail the package may be sent by post to US Army CECOM Acquisition Center Washington, 2461 Eisenhower Ave, Room 1126, Attn: AMSEL-AC-WA (Ms. Tina Patterson), Alexandria, Va., 22331-0700.

All requests for further information must be made in writing via e-mail, not by telephone. More information is available online at http://www.navair.navy.mil/doing_business/open_solicitations/solicitation_view_action.cfm?Sol_No=N00421-08-R-0003.

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