New reprogrammable chip to help Navy replace AN/AYK-14 computers

PLEASANTON, Calif. - Scientists at CPU Technology, a Pleasanton, Calif., computer firm that specializes in microprocessor performance analysis and design, are developing a new single-chip reprogrammable processor to replace the venerable U.S. Navy AN/AYK-14 standard airborne computer.

Mar 1st, 1998

By John Rhea

PLEASANTON, Calif. - Scientists at CPU Technology, a Pleasanton, Calif., computer firm that specializes in microprocessor performance analysis and design, are developing a new single-chip reprogrammable processor to replace the venerable U.S. Navy AN/AYK-14 standard airborne computer.

Designated the MS1, the chip is intended to bridge past, present, and future. The old Control Data AYK-14 computer, which has been a mainstay for carrier-based aircraft such as the F-14 jet fighter, F/A-18 fighter-bomber, and E-2C surveillance aircraft, is simply no longer powerful enough to handle new generations of mission software.

The MS1 incorporates a dual instruction set architecture and will run existing Navy tactical flight software, as well as anticipated future software, to provide a bridge to modern processors.

The new chip is also compatible with commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) processors so that programmers can use commercial tools in the upgrade process.

Other features of the MS1 are real-time non-intrusive instrumentation, known as RTNI, to give developers greater visibility into the processor operation than they can today, as well as instruction-level fault tolerance. This increases reliability beyond the legacy processor being replaced.

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