Raytheon to upgrade fire-control systems in Marine M1A1 battle tanks

Marine Corps Systems Command officials at Quantico Marine Base, Va., issued a $12.6 million order to Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems in McKinney, Texas, for the Abrams Integrated Display and Targeting System (AIDATS) to upgrade U.S. Marine Corps General Dynamics M1A1 Abrams main battle tanks.

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QUANTICO, Va. - Marine Corps Systems Command officials at Quantico Marine Base, Va., issued a $12.6 million order to Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems in McKinney, Texas, for the Abrams Integrated Display and Targeting System (AIDATS) to upgrade U.S. Marine Corps General Dynamics M1A1 Abrams main battle tanks.

The U.S. Marine Corps M1A1 main battle tank is set for a major electro-optical systems upgrade to enhance the tank's fire control.

The AIDATS upgrade to 400 Marine Corps M1A1 tanks will improve situational awareness with an upgraded thermal sight, color day camera, and single stationary display. AIDATS is an enhancement to the current uncooled thermal sight module and display control module for the weapon station. It substitutes a color camera for the M1A1's black-and-white camera, and adds a daylight and nighttime thermal sight, simplified handling with one set of controls, and a slew-to-cue button that repositions the turret with one command.

The system is the primary interface between the tank commander and his weapon system, and consists of color day camera, uncooled thermal sight, system display and processor, power filter module, software and firmware, as well as related components. The system display, power filter module, and cabling are integrated into the interior of the M1A1 turret in front of the tank commander's position without interfering with simultaneous movement of the tank turret and tank commander cupola. The color day camera and thermal sight are mounted on the outside of the M1A1 and are attached to the stabilized commander's weapon station.

On this order Raytheon will do the work in McKinney, Texas, and should be finished by August 2017.

FOR MORE INFORMATION visit Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems online at www.raytheon.com.

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