Army reaches out to industry for real-time positioning technologies for close combat training

NATICK, Mass., 9 Dec. 2015. U.S. Army combat training experts are surveying industry to find companies with the expertise in indoor positioning systems that could help improve close-quarters combat training.

Army reaches out to industry for real-time positioning technologies for close combat training
Army reaches out to industry for real-time positioning technologies for close combat training
NATICK, Mass., 9 Dec. 2015. U.S. Army combat training experts are surveying industry to find companies with the expertise in indoor positioning systems that could help improve close-quarters combat training.

Officials of the Army Contracting Command in Natick, Mass., issued a request for information on Tuesday (W911QY-16-R-0022) for the Indoor Positioning System Platform for close-quarters combat Training Efficiencies at the Naval Health Research Center (NHRC) project.

Army researchers, on behalf of the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego, are looking for companies able to perform research in hardware and software to help track the positions of as many as 70 close-combat trainees in real time.

Experts at the Naval Health Research Center have been working for the past three years to fine-tune close-quarters combat training -- particularly for Navy Special Forces warfighters like Navy Sea, Air and Land Teams (SEALs).

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Close combat trainees are being groomed to meet a certain standard of performance, Army officials say. Close-quarters combat is a unique type of combat requiring specialized tactics, techniques, and procedures. Proficiency in close-quarters combat is a foundational skill for Navy Special Forces, as close-quarters combat is a common component across many of their missions.

Close-quarters combat also is highly stressful on participants because Special Forces must fight enemies close by and in confined spaces. Close-quarters combat environments typically involve the quick identification of threats, target acquisition, and shoot/don't shoot decision making.

Army researchers are looking for a system with small replaceable sensors that uses low power, reports position between one to three feet, is easy to use, moveable between training sites, and that runs on a local computer server.

This close-combat positioning system not only must provide an application program interface (API) from which a separate software platform easily can access pre-processed data, but also must be flexible enough to incorporate future sensors as they're developed to keep training tools up to date.

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The system will consist of a tablet software, Wi-Fi localization system, and a local server. The software will be compatible with any modern W browser and can operate on a smart phone, tablet computer, or personal computer. In addition, the system be usable across any military commands with limited customization.

Companies interested should email responses no longer than 15 pages no later than 7 Jan. 2016 to the Army's Jeremy Michaels at jeremy.d.michaels.civ@mail.mil. Phone Michaels with questions or concerns at 301-619-7421.

More information is online at https://www.fbo.gov/notices/e3858e6923687b5358e7fa9d906e0904.

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