BAE Systems helping Navy develop next-generation electronic warfare (EW) technologies

ARLINGTON, Va., 12 Oct. 2015. Electronic warfare (EW) experts at BAE Systems are developing a full-spectrum staring electronic support receiver (FSSR) with instantaneous direction finding (IDF) for potential use in Navy next-generation EW applications.

Navy eyes next generation of electronic warfare
Navy eyes next generation of electronic warfare
ARLINGTON, Va., 12 Oct. 2015.Electronic warfare (EW)experts at BAE Systems are developing a full-spectrum staring electronic support receiver (FSSR) with instantaneous direction finding (IDF) for potential use in next-generation Navy EW applications.

Officials of the Office of Naval Research (ONR) in Arlington, Va., announced an $11 million contract Thursday to the BAE Systems Electronic Systems segment in Nashua, N.H., as part of the ONR Electronic Warfare Technology program, which seeks to develop and demonstrate RF and microwave technologies for next-generation EW technologies.

BAE Systems engineers will design and demonstrate a full-spectrum staring electronic support receiver with instantaneous direction finding that capitalizes on emerging and innovative electronic and photonic component technologies into an end-to-end electronic warfare demonstration system.

BAE Systems experts will subject their FSSR to a realistic, multi-threat electromagnetic environment, including interfering emitters, to demonstrate its operational potential under terminal engagement scenarios of interest to the Navy.

Related: Navy orders shipboard electronic warfare systems from Lockheed Martin in $153.9 million contract

ONR's Electronic Warfare Technology program seeks to develop innovations in electronics and software that could lead to the next generation of EW applications.

The goal is to enable Navy and Marine Corps forces to control the electromagnetic spectrum by exploiting, deceiving, or denying enemy use of the spectrum while ensuring its use by friendly forces.

In addition to the BAE Systems work to develop a FSSR with IDF, ONR researchers also are interested in improved threat warning systems; electronic warfare support (ES); decoys and countermeasures against weapon tracking and guidance systems; electronic attack (EA) against adversary command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR); and electronic protection (EP) of Navy weapons and C4ISR from intentional and unintentional interference.

The program's four areas of core interest are radio frequency and millimeter wave electronic warfare subsystem demonstrators; compact and efficient EW antennas covering frequencies ranging from 3 to 300 MHz; W-band millimeter wave high-power transmitters; and innovative EW concepts.

RF and millimeter wave EW subsystem demonstrations should use either existing open-systems standards such as OpenVPX, or industry standards to which the government has full and open rights, Navy researchers say. Reducing size, weight, and power (SWaP) is a driving concern.

Related: Navy orders 46 sophisticated electronic warfare jammers for Navy F/A-18 Hornet strike fighters

Compact and efficient EW antennas covering frequencies ranging from 3 to 300 MHz seeks should enable Navy, Marine Corps, and joint-service EW systems to detect, deny, or deceive sensors, communications or other systems operating in the HF and VHF bands. Goals include developing small antennas no longer than one meter with directional capabilities.

W-band millimeter wave high-power transmitters will involve frequencies from 75 to 110 GHz able to achieve one to four kilowatts for small decoy applications, or that can be combined to achieve 100 kilowatts or more for large platforms.

Innovative EW concepts seeks to explore concepts that fundamentally could change the way military forces conduct EW operations.

On this contract BAE Systems will do the work in Nashua, N.H., and should be finished by October 2018. For more information contact BAE Systems Electronic Systems online at www.baesystems.com, or the Office of Naval Research at www.onr.navy.mil.

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