Marine Corps asks industry for wearable IMUs to help measure infantry fatigue and performance

QUANTICO MARINE BASE, Va., 9 June 2016. U.S. Marine Corps researchers are reaching out to industry to determine if companies could provide wearable inertial measurement units (IMUs) small enough to attach to the feet, legs, backs, and chests of Marine infantrymen.

Jun 9th, 2016
Marine Corps asks industry for wearable IMUs to help measure infantry fatigue and performance
Marine Corps asks industry for wearable IMUs to help measure infantry fatigue and performance
QUANTICO MARINE BASE, Va., 9 June 2016. U.S. Marine Corps researchers are reaching out to industry to determine if companies could provide wearable inertial measurement units (IMUs) small enough to attach to the feet, legs, backs, and chests of Marine infantrymen.

Officials of the Marine Corps Systems Command at Quantico Marine Base, Va., issued a source-sought notice on Tuesday (M67854-16-N-0510) for small lightweight IMUs to help with infantry mobility research.

Researchers want to gather IMU data from Marine infantrymen to evaluate the fatigue and performance of Marines operating in the field over a variety of terrain and carrying different kinds of warfighter equipment.

Experts will use this IMU data for biomechanical analyses, as well as modeling and simulation. This notice is a request for information only, and is not a request for proposals.

Marine Corps researchers are looking for the ability to collect body movement data and other performance measurements in the laboratory and in the field by analyzing movement data from a system of wearable IMUs.

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Researchers want gyroscope performance of at least three axes, plus-or-minus 2000 degree per second, noise of 0.05 deg/s/vHz, sampling rate 1280 Hz, output rate 20 to 128 Hz, resolution 50 Hz, and 14 bit resolution.

Accelerometers should be able to measure least 3 axes and as much as 14 Gs of acceleration, noise of 0.0012 m/s²/vHz, sampling rate of 1280 Hz, output rate of 20 to 128 Hz, and resolution of 50 Hz, 14 bit resolution.

Magnetometers should be able to measure at least three axes, plus-or-minus 6 Gauss, noise 0.5 mGauss, sampling rate 1280 Hz, output rate 20 to 128 Hz, resolution 50 Hz, and 14 bit resolution.

Orientation should have roll and pitch static accuracy of 1.15 degrees, heading static accuracy of 1.50 degrees, and dynamic accuracy of 2.8 degrees.

The IMUs should operate in an adjustable wireless frequency band 2.4 to 2.5 GHz, and be able to transmit data wirelessly from 10 to 30 meters. Wireless update rates should be at least 128 Hz for as many as 24 IMUs.

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Each IMU should weigh no more than 0.8 ounces with battery, measure no lager than 49 by 36 by 14 millimeters, and offer single push-button synchronization, or a similar sync system. Time synchronization should be no more than 1 millisecond between two IMUs without the assistance from an external device.

The devices should be able to store at least 8 gigabytes of data, have 8-hour battery life while streaming and at least 16 hours while logging. IMUs should be water and sweat resistant, and come with an access point wireless receiver with USB cable and power supply.

The IMUs also should come with straps, wireless remotes, analysis software, carrying cases, Windows 10 software support, accessory cords and cables for use with laptop computers for data download and battery charging.

Companies interested should email 20-page white papers no later than 20 June 2016 to britni.jones@usmc.mil. Email questions or concerns to the same email address.

More information is online at https://www.fbo.gov/spg/DON/USMC/Contracts_Office_CTQ8/M67854-16-N-0510/listing.html.

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