5-volt radiation-tolerant multiplexers for space applications introduced by Intersil

MILPITAS, Calif., 4 April 2016. Intersil Corp. in Milpitas, Calif., is introducing two single-supply 5-volt radiation-tolerant multiplexers for satellite and space exploration applications.

Apr 4th, 2016
By Mil & Aero staff
By Mil & Aero staff

MILPITAS, Calif., 4 April 2016. Intersil Corp. in Milpitas, Calif., is introducing two single-supply 5-volt radiation-tolerant multiplexers for satellite and space exploration applications.

The 16-channel ISL71830SEH and 32-channel ISL71831SEH multiplexers join Intersil's 30-volt multiplexers, which have been onboard several satellite and space exploration missions, including NASA's Orion spacecraft flight test.

The 5-volt multiplexers address the growing trend toward reduced system voltage rails, Intersil officials say. They provide data acquisition systems with electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection, and deliver lower RON and input leakage for reduced power consumption and higher signal integrity.

The 5-volt multiplexers also offer faster propagation delays, which significantly improve signal processing response time. The ISL71830SEH and ISL71831SEH capitalize on Intersil's proprietary silicon on insulator process, which provides single event latch-up (SEL) robustness in heavy ion environments.

The devices' enhanced 5 kilovolt ESD protection have eliminates the need for external protection diodes on the input pins. In addition, both multiplexers have reduced RON of 120 Ohms and propagation delays of less than 100 nanoseconds to increase the overall performance and accuracy of telemetry signals processed and multiplexed into an analog-to-digital converter's input.

Related: Radiation-hardened multiplexers for manned spacecraft and satellites introduced by Intersil

The ISL71830SEH and ISL71831SEH offer over-voltage protection on a per-switch basis to maintain the continuous processing of hundreds of telemetry test points.

If any input channel experiences an over-voltage condition, the remaining channels continue sending data to the ADC. Both multiplexers provide a "cold spare" redundant capability, allowing the connection of 2-3 additional unpowered multiplexers to a common data bus.

This mission-critical have is required for long duration space flights. The system automatically activates the backup multiplexer should a failure occur.

For more information contact Intersil online at www.intersil.com.

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