Raytheon to replace obsolete electronic circuit boards and enclosures in military air traffic control system

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala., 5 June 2011. U.S. Army leaders needed electronics enclosures and circuit boards to replace obsolete components in the AN/TPN-31 Air Traffic Navigation, Integration, and Coordination System (ATNAVICS) -- a military air traffic control system that can be transported on C-130 aircraft. They found their solution from the Raytheon Co. Network Centric Systems segment in Marlborough, Mass. Raytheon will develop electronics enclosures and associated electronic circuit boards to replace obsolete signal date processors in the airport surveillance radar and precision approach radar portions of the ATNAVICS system.

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REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala., 5 June 2011. U.S. Army leaders needed electronics enclosures and circuit boards to replace obsolete electronics in the AN/TPN-31 Air Traffic Navigation, Integration, and Coordination System (ATNAVICS) -- a military air traffic control system that can be transported on C-130 aircraft. They found their solution from the Raytheon Co. Network Centric Systems segment in Marlborough, Mass.Raytheon will develop electronics enclosures and associated electronic circuit boards to replace obsolete signal date processors in the airport surveillance radar and precision approach radar portions of the ATNAVICS system. The company is doing the work under terms of a $12 million contract from the Army Contracting Command at Redstone Arsenal, Ala.The ATNAVICS is an autonomous radar approach control system that complies with standards for the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS) and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). The system is transportable aboard C-130 cargo aircraft, and is designed to support aircraft operations in forward-deployed military areas, as well as in civil disaster areas.

The ATNAVICS has a radar vehicle and tactical generator trailer, uses an S-Band air surveillance radar, an L-Band secondary surveillance radar and identification-friend-or foe (IFF) system, and an X-Band precision-approach radar.

ATNAVICS uses Raytheon's AutoTrac automation software, which enables the controller display to be placed as far as 3,200 feet away from the radar using optical fiber.

Raytheon will do the work at the company's Airspace Management and Homeland Security (AMHS) business unit in Marlborough, Mass., and Waterloo, Ontario, and should be finished by the end of March 2013. For more information contact Raytheon online at www.raytheon.com/businesses/ncs/amhs, or the Army's Redstone Arsenal at www.garrison.redstone.army.mil.

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