Quarter-brick regulated bus converter power electronics for embedded systems introduced by Murata Power

MANSFIELD, Mass., 11 April 2011. Murata Power Solutions in Mansfield, Mass., is introducing a quarter-brick open-frame regulated bus converter (RBC) for embedded systems, base stations, cellular telephone repeaters, as well as 48-volt powered data communications and communications installations. The power electronics device delivers as much as 210 Watts output power, has a voltage input range of 36 to 75 volts, 92 percent efficiency at full load, and voltage output regulation of plus-or-minus 1.5 percent. Murata Power designed the RBC for distributed power regulated intermediate bus architectures (RIBAs) to drive point-of-load converters.

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MANSFIELD, Mass., 11 April 2011. Murata Power Solutions in Mansfield, Mass., is introducing a quarter-brick open-frame regulated bus converter (RBC) for embedded systems, base stations, cellular telephone repeaters, as well as 48-volt powered data communications and communications installations.The power electronics device delivers as much as 210 Watts output power, has a voltage input range of 36 to 75 volts, 92 percent efficiency at full load, and voltage output regulation of plus-or-minus 1.5 percent. Murata Power designed the RBC for distributed power regulated intermediate bus architectures (RIBAs) to drive point-of-load converters.The isolated RBC-12/17-D48 accepts power input ranges from 36 to 75 volts DC, and converts this power to a 12-volt DC, 17-amp output. the device measures 2.22 by 1.45 inches, and is 0.42 inches high.

The devices uses a synchronous-rectifier topology and 225 kHz fixed-frequency operation. Protection features include input under-voltage (UV) lockout, output current limiting, short-circuit hiccup, over-temperature shutdown, and output over-voltage. Positive or negative polarity remote on and off control is optional.

Users can specify a base plate for mounting to cold surfaces or natural-convection heatsinks for applications without forced-air cooling. For more information contact Murata Power online at www.murata-ps.com.

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