Rugged Intel computer for military, surveillance, and factory automation introduced by Portwell

Dec. 5, 2014
FREMONT, Calif., 5 Dec. 2014. American Portwell Technology Inc. in Fremont, Calif., is introducing the WEBS-3581 high-performance rugged fanless Box PC for a broad range of military, digital security surveillance, medical, factory and industry automation, and retail applications.
FREMONT, Calif., 5 Dec. 2014. American Portwell Technology Inc. in Fremont, Calif., is introducing the WEBS-3581 high-performance rugged fanless Box PC for a broad range of military, digital security surveillance, medical, factory and industry automation, and retail applications.

The WEBS-3581 rugged computer is powered by the 4th generation Intel CoreT processor with integrated HD4600 graphic engine, and can support triple display with high-resolution.

The WEBS-3581 achieves low power consumption by using a 35-Watt Intel desktop CPU and Intel Q87 chipset. The Mini-ITX embedded board drives the WEBS-3581 system with more combined options for specific functions, such as high-demand graphic applications.

The system supports dual-channel DDR3 memory to 16 gigabytes. It also provides two 2.5-inch SATA solid-state drives and one SATA DOM for storage. Furthermore, the WEBS-3581 Box PC has three independent display interfaces (VGA/HDMI/DisplayPort), six COM ports (two RS-232/422/485 ports and four RS-232 ports), four USB 3.0 and two USB 2.0 ports, two Gigabit Ethernet ports, one 8 bits GPIO port, and Mic-in/Line-in/Line-out audio interfaces.

For the wireless function, the optional WiFi or 3G/GPS module can be added via a mini PCI Express slot. The rugged computer operates in temperatures from -20 to 50 degrees Celsius, and is suitable for factory and industrial automation. It has an input voltage range from 12 to 36 volts.

For more information contact American Portwell online at www.portwell.com.

About the Author

John Keller | Editor

John Keller is editor-in-chief of Military & Aerospace Electronics magazine, which provides extensive coverage and analysis of enabling electronic and optoelectronic technologies in military, space, and commercial aviation applications. A member of the Military & Aerospace Electronics staff since the magazine's founding in 1989, Mr. Keller took over as chief editor in 1995.

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