Megarad-level rad-hard 64-megabit solid-state memory introduced by Honeywell for military satellites

PHOENIX, 10 Dec. 2010. Honeywell Inc. in Phoenix is introducing a 64-megabit solid-state memory component that withstands one megarad of total-dose radiation for military satellite applications during extreme radiation environments or extended space flight. Honeywell’s 64-megabit static random access memory (SRAM) multi-chip module (MCM) uses proprietary technology to bond four 16-megabit chips into one 86-pin module.

Dec 10th, 2010
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PHOENIX, 10 Dec. 2010. Honeywell Inc. in Phoenix is introducing a 64-megabit radiation-hardenedsolid-state memory component that withstands 1 megarad of total-dose radiation for military satellite applications operating in extreme radiation environments or extended space flight. Honeywell’s rad-hard 64-megabit static random access memory (SRAM) multi-chip module (MCM) uses proprietary technology to bond four 16-megabit chips into one 86-pin module.

The 64-megabit memory typically consumes less than 400-milliwatts of power at 40-MHz operational speed and has a typical read access time of 13-nanoseconds at 3.3 volts. Chips are fabricated using a low-power silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process with a minimum drawn have size of 150-nanometers.

The Honeywell (NYSE: HON) 64-megabit rad-hard SRAM can withstand total-dose radiation of as much as one megarad (one million rads) -- and accomplishes this without using internal error detection and correction (EDAC) that uses parity bits to detect memory errors. EDAC is used by other radiation hardened memory suppliers to meet Honeywell’s standard, which adds about 13 percent more cost and power consumption.

Honeywell proprietary radiation hardened technology combined with advanced design, layout, and process hardening techniques, provides the ability for this SRAM to sustain high radiation dosages and continue to operate.

Radiation at levels of 100,000 rads is capable of permanently disabling a common memory chip in a typical laptop computer, Honeywell officials explain. Rad is the measure of the amount of energy produced by gamma radiation in a cubic centimeter of air.

“Honeywell’s 64-megabit SRAM is designed and priced for low-power applications in commercial and military satellites where radiation can be an issue,” says Keith Nootbaar, senior director of microelectronics and precision sensors at Honeywell Aerospace. “Honeywell’s module allows system designers to quadruple data storage in the same footprint as the next largest available radiation hardened memory.”

For more information contact Honeywell Aerospace online at www51.honeywell.com/aero.

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