Innov-X demonstrates x-ray fluorescence screening at Military Technologies Conference

WOBURN, MASS., 3 April 2007. Visitors to Innov-X's exhibit booth at the Military Technologies Conference (MTC; http://www.miltechconference.com) held last week in Boston were among the first to learn how using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) can screen components, parts, cables, and printed circuit boards for leaded vs. non-leaded compliance.

WOBURN, MASS., 3 April 2007. Visitors to Innov-X's exhibit booth at the Military Technologies Conference (MTC; http://www.miltechconference.com) held last week in Boston were among the first to learn how using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) can screen components, parts, cables, and printed circuit boards for leaded vs. non-leaded compliance.

Those responsible for building and maintaining electronics for military, aerospace, and medical use are concerned over the abundance of "lead-free" and "RoHS compliant" components and devices that can be co-mingled with leaded parts. Component marking issues and incorrect product certifications can lead to inventory mix-ups, which can impact reliability and become severe problems in the field.

Screening helps professionals confirm that materials are as required -- either leaded or lead-free. Portable XRF tests in many cases provides a simple, fast, non-destructive screening method to confirm suppliers' certifications and mitigate risk by identifying problems before they can go too far in the production process.

Innov-X XRF analyzers are screening devices that have the ability to check for lead (Pb) and the other RoHS substances in a simple point-and-shoot test.

For analyzing complex components, Innov-X's hand-held analyzer uses a laser to place a pinpoint test area of down to 3 mm diameter. The image and sample target are displayed on the color PDA screen in real time. Snapshot images of samples analyzed plus laser-targeted small-spot analysis are saved as part of the test records.

By using an Innov-X Systems XRF analyzer in a screening test program, materials can be identified in seconds.

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