Aircraft and missile designers choose power device with integrated EMI filtering

Systems designers at several prominent defense and electronics companies had a common problem: they needed small integrated devices that not only control power, but also that filer out electromagnetic interference (EMI). Many of them found their solution in the ADDC028xx-series hybrid military DC-DC converters from Analog Devices Inc. (ADI) of Greensboro, N.C.

Feb 1st, 2000
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Aircraft and missile designers choose power device with integrated EMI filtering

Systems designers at several prominent defense and electronics companies had a common problem: they needed small integrated devices that not only control power, but also that filer out electromagnetic interference (EMI). Many of them found their solution in the ADDC028xx-series hybrid military DC-DC converters from Analog Devices Inc. (ADI) of Greensboro, N.C.

A DC-DC converter with integrated EMI filter enables designers to reduce interference without using an external filter or external filter bricks, says Bob Barfield, product line manager For military and aerospace DC-DC converters at Analog Devices.

"Previous solutions would require designers to build an EMI filter to meet the requirements of MIL-STD-461D," Barfield explains. "ADI has a part with an integrated EMI filter on the same foot print as a device without a filter."

He says the ADDC028xx-series design can cut the space necessary for power-control electronics by half over approaches that rely on external circuit designs.

MIL-STD-461D is a conducted and radiated EMI emissions and susceptibility standard for defense electronics, which is in place to ensure safety and reliability and minimize downtime and breakdowns of important military equipment. The standard describes the immunity testing requirements and test levels for electrical, electronic, and electro-mechanical equipment.

Among the military systems in which designers have placed ADDC028xx-series DC-DC converters are the U.S. Navy Raytheon Standard Missile, U.S. Marine Corps Bell-Boeing V-22 Tiltrotor aircraft, the U.S. Air Force Lockheed-Martin F-16 jet fighter, and the Swedish Saab Grippen jet fighter, Barfield says.

Analog Devices engineers designed the part specifically for high-density applications in avionics, missiles, ground-based communications, flight-control systems, shipboard power systems, fighter aircraft, helicopters, and sonar systems, he says.

The ADDC028xx-series is a fixed-frequency 550 kHz flyback DC-DC converter that operates off standard military 28-volt power buses. It has a power density of 34 watts per cubic inch, offers as much as 35 watts of total output power, and operates over input ranges of 16 to 50 volts DC.

The devices operate at junction temperatures as hot as 150 degrees Celsius, and at case operating temperatures as hot as 125 C. The devices also comply to the military Qualified Manufacturing List (QML) MIL-PRF-38534.

Each device is 0.39 inches tall, 1.5 inches wide, 2.75 inches long, and weighs 40 grams. The devices are available in hermetically sealed packages, and offer three screening grades: the MIL-STD 883B standard military drawing, the TV 883B, and QML-H.

For more information, contact Barfield by phone at 336-605-4063, by fax at 336-668-0101, by e-mail at bob.barfield@analog.com, by post at 7910 Triad Center Drive, Greensboro, N.C. 27409, or on the World Wide Web at http://www.analog.com/. Circle 100

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The ADDC028xx-series hybrid military DC-DC converter from Analog Devices saves space by integrating power- control electronics and electromagnetic interference filter in the same package.

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