Demand increases for chemical/biological sensors

The worldwide demand for chemical warfare agent detectors will grow by 12 percent through 2005 due to heightened awareness of chemical and biological agents, according to analysts at Frost & Sullivan in Mountain View, Calif. In a report entitled "World Markets for Chemical and Biological Warfare Agent Detection," Frost & Sullivan analysts say the United States accounts for the majority of the chemical-detection market. U.S. revenues for chemical detectors were $144 million in 1998, according to

Jul 1st, 1998

The worldwide demand for chemical warfare agent detectors will grow by 12 percent through 2005 due to heightened awareness of chemical and biological agents, according to analysts at Frost & Sullivan in Mountain View, Calif. In a report entitled "World Markets for Chemical and Biological Warfare Agent Detection," Frost & Sullivan analysts say the United States accounts for the majority of the chemical-detection market. U.S. revenues for chemical detectors were $144 million in 1998, according to Frost & Sullivan. Passive and remote detection technologies for chemical warfare agents include Fourier transform infrared, Raman IR spectroscopy, active laser imaging detection ranging, ion mobility spectrometry, field ion spectrometry, gas chromatography, and mass spectroscopy. For more information, contact Frost & Sullivan`s Kathleen Cooney by phone at 650-237-4385, by fax at 650-903-0915, by e-mail at kcooney@frost.com, or on the World Wide Web at http://www.frost.com. - J.K.

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