Laser designator electro-optical sensor to be restored by Northrop Grumman

APOKA, Fla.—Military laser experts at the Northrop Grumman Laser Systems segment in Apoka, Fla., are restoring and refurbishing U.S. Army laser systems that can recognize and designate targets for laser guided munitions, under terms of a $21.9 million contract.

Th Laser Designator 01

APOKA, Fla.—Military laser experts at the Northrop Grumman Laser Systems segment in Apoka, Fla., are restoring and refurbishing U.S. Army laser systems that can recognize and designate targets for laser guided munitions, under terms of a $21.9 million contract.

Th Laser Designator 01
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Northrop Grumman will carry out the “field level reset” of the AN/PED-1 LLDR Lightweight Laser Designator Rangefinder (LLDR), under terms of the contract from the Army Research, Development & Engineering Command (RDECOM), Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. Reset means to restore the laser designator to combat capability. Work should be finished by fall of 2014.

The LLDR electro-optical sensor helps forward observers, forward air controllers, and naval gunfire spot teams recognize targets in daylight, at night, and in haze, smoke, fog, and rain. The military laser range finder determines range to the target with an eye-safe laser, and calculates grid coordinates with its built-in GPS, elevation, and azimuth sensing capability.

In 2006, Northrop Grumman upgraded this dismounted electro-optic sensor by decreasing system weight, increasing its ability to operate in low-visibility conditions, and replacing components no longer supported by vendors. The system has been used in Afghanistan and Iraq to provide targeting information for laser-guided, GPS-guided, and conventional munitions.

For more information, visit Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems online at www.es.northropgrumman.com.

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