Ericsson tries to kick-start demand for Bluetooth

Leaders of Ericsson Technology Licensing in Lund, Sweden, are trying to kick-start unexpectedly slow development of its Bluetooth extremely short-range radio technology.

By J.R. Wilson

LUND, Sweden — Leaders of Ericsson Technology Licensing in Lund, Sweden, are trying to kick-start unexpectedly slow development of its Bluetooth extremely short-range radio technology.

To do this, they are announcing a new Bluetooth Embedded Stack software solution it says will enable original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to launch new Bluetooth products at reduced cost.

Offered by Ericsson, along with other Bluetooth implementations, the Embedded Stack enables OEMs to integrate their application in the Bluetooth chip, creating a more cost-effective solution for applications in which size, power consumption, and cost are paramount.

"This is a move from Ericsson Technology Licensing that will help the Bluetooth industry to increase the number of Bluetooth products," says division president Maria Khorsand. "Our new software will definitely enhance the possibilities to reduce costs for implementation of Bluetooth wireless technology."

Khorsand also claims recent surveys have shown increased consumer familiarity with Bluetooth in the past year and a corresponding increase in interest in the wireless technology.

Bluetooth has a raw throughput of 1 megabit per second (but an actual data rate of 728 kilobits per second) at ranges shorter than 10 meters.

Operating in the 2.4GHz industrial-scientific-medial (ISM) band, it uses a frequency hop spread spectrum ° 1600 hops per second ° to avoid interference with other devices operating at 2.4GHz, including portable phones and microwave ovens.

Cahners In-Stat Group, which has been surveying the potential market for Bluetooth, predicts close to 700 million Bluetooth devices will be shipping annually by 2005.

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