Lockheed Martin team designs missile guidance hardware

CALGARY, Alberta, 23 May 2005. Cyberhand Technologies International, Inc. announced that it has entered into a research project with the Lockheed Martin Corp. to develop a missile guidance hardware system based on the combined technologies of Cyberhand's Viper high performance game controller and the Racer ergonomic mouse.

CALGARY, Alberta, 23 May 2005. Cyberhand Technologies International, Inc. announced that it has entered into a research project with the Lockheed Martin Corp. to develop a missile guidance hardware system based on the combined technologies of Cyberhand's Viper high performance game controller and the Racer ergonomic mouse.

"Originally approached over two years ago, Cyberhand is now pleased to be able to proceed with this research project to develop the world's most responsive missile guidance hardware system for Lockheed Martin," said Mike Burke, president of Cyberhand.

"Not only will this relationship open the doors to the extremely demanding and exacting world of military hardware systems, but it will also allow Cyberhand to use technology developed for this industry and apply it to its existing game controller and ergonomic computer mouse product lines."

Cyberhand Technologies International, Inc. is a computer peripheral design company specializing in innovative wireless ergonomic products for mobile and desktop users. The company designs, manufactures, markets and sells leading edge consumer electronics devices that feature innovative ergonomic designs, advanced software development and technologies that are far superior to other products in the market. Cyberhand is focused on developing products that allow computer, Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) and Smartphone users the ultimate in mobility, productivity, performance and comfort.

Initial products include:
* computer game controllers that are 40% more responsive than competing products,
* wireless keyboards for PDAs and smartphones,
* ergonomic computer mouse products that eliminate computer-related repetitive stress injuries, and
* related software upgrades and other peripherals such as keyboards, cameras and scanners.

For more information, see www.cyberhand.com.

More in Home