Lockheed Martin to make guided MLRS rocket

DALLAS, Texas, 16 February 2005. Lockheed Martin has received a $108 million Low-Rate Initial Production-3 (LRIP-3) contract from the U.S. Army to produce 1,014 Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System (GMLRS) rockets.

DALLAS, Texas, 16 February 2005. Lockheed Martin has received a $108 million Low-Rate Initial Production-3 (LRIP-3) contract from the U.S. Army to produce 1,014 Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System (GMLRS) rockets.

"The U.S. Army has expressed a need for greater accuracy from its fire support systems," said Ron Abbott, vice president for Tactical Missiles at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. "Guided MLRS provides the warfighter with accuracy that is literally measured in meters, giving our soldiers a more accurate, more effective solution to their fire support requirements."

The GMLRS rocket is the latest addition to the MLRS family of munitions. GMLRS is an all-weather, precision-guided rocket that provides increased accuracy thus reducing the number of rockets necessary to defeat current targets by 80 percent. The GMLRS rocket provides increased precision and maneuverability, and can be fired from the MLRS M270 and M270A1 launchers and the High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) launcher.

Work on the contract will be performed at Lockheed Martin facilities in Dallas, Texas, and Camden, Ark. Delivery of the rockets is expected in 2006 and 2007. The Army Aviation & Missile Command in Huntsville, Ala., is the contracting agency.

In June 2003, Lockheed Martin received its first GMLRS LRIP contract, valued at $24 million, for 156 missiles. In February 2004, an $85 million LRIP-2 contract was signed for an additional 840 GMLRS rockets. The Army plans to buy more than 100,000 GMLRS rockets.

The GMLRS program successfully completed operationally testing in December 2004. More than 24 GMLRS rockets were fired from a MLRS M270A1 and HIMARS launchers over a two-month time period.

GMLRS is a Future Force system with a range of more than 70 kilometers. The system incorporates a GPS-aided inertial guidance package integrated on a product-improved rocket body. Small canards on the guided rocket nose provide basic maneuverability and enhance the accuracy of the system. For more information, see www.lockheedmartin.com.

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