Space Test Program to launch Naval Research Lab space science and technology experiments

PHILADELPHIA, 11 Aug. 2011. Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) officials are exercising a $13 million option on an existing software development contract with Lockheed Martin (NYSE:LMT). Engineers will continue to maintain and sustain the Tactical Tomahawk Weapons Control System (TTWCS). TTWCS, one of three major components comprising the Tomahawk Weapons System, integrates launch hardware and software to provide weapon control for Tomahawk Land Attack Missile variants. Lockheed Martin staff will also provide the software development, systems engineering, software and hardware deployment support needed to upgrade TTWCS, as well as management required to continue system upgrades addressing hardware, software, and interoperability obsolescence issues.

Aug 11th, 2011
Pennwell web 243 400

Posted by Courtney E. Howard


PHILADELPHIA, 11 Aug. 2011. Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) officials are exercising a $13 million option on an existing software development contract with Lockheed Martin (NYSE:LMT). Engineers will continue to maintain and sustain the Tactical Tomahawk Weapons Control System (TTWCS). TTWCS, one of three major components comprising the Tomahawk Weapons System, integrates launch hardware and software to provide weapon control for Tomahawk Land Attack Missile variants. Lockheed Martin staff will also provide the software development, systems engineering, software and hardware deployment support needed to upgrade TTWCS, as well as management required to continue system upgrades addressing hardware, software, and interoperability obsolescence issues.

The total contract value could reach $50.2 million, if NAVAIR exercises the three remaining options. Work will be performed at the company’s Valley Forge, Pa., facility. Lockheed Martin has supported all versions of the Tomahawk Weapons Control System.

"Over the decades, Lockheed Martin has worked closely with the Tomahawk Weapons System program office in the evolution of Tomahawk, often the first weapon employed when our nation goes to combat," says Jim Quinn, vice president of C4ISR Systems with Lockheed Martin's IS&GS-Defense. "We will continue to apply our systems, software, and hardware engineering expertise to ensure that Tomahawk remains a viable and responsive weapon system."

Ship classes programmed for the Tomahawk capability include: all Navy cruisers, all Navy destroyers, and all attack and guided missile-class submarines. Integration of the Tomahawk Weapons System with these launch platforms provides the fleet with an enhanced capability to satisfy the Navy's vision elicited in Sea Power 21, specifically the Sea Strike pillar.

Part of the Tomahawk System Development Activity, Lockheed Martin--with Navy labs in Dahlgren, Va., Newport, R.I., and Port Hueneme, Calif.--maintains current fleet products and develops new products that address emerging fleet priorities.

More in Home