BiTMICRO, Cadence, Synopsys partner to help open microelectronics institute in Philippines

MANILA, Philippines, 15 Oct. 2011. The Bruce Institute of Technology (BIT), a training institute with specific focus on microelectronics design and storage network systems, has debuted in the Philippines with the help of U.S.-based businesses serving the aerospace and defense community, among others. Officials at the industry-led microelectronics training center having an emphasis on microchip design and development has partnered with Synopsys and Cadence to develop and run industry-relevant microelectronics design engineering programs.

Posted by Courtney E. Howard

MANILA, Philippines, 15 Oct. 2011. The Bruce Institute of Technology (BIT), a training institute with specific focus on microelectronics design and storage network systems, has debuted in the Philippines with the help of U.S.-based businesses serving the aerospace and defense community, among others. Officials at the industry-led microelectronics training center having an emphasis on microchip design and development has partnered with Synopsys and Cadence to develop and run industry-relevant microelectronics design engineering programs.

BIT’s first program will be the development of the Philippines’ first commercially viable microprocessor. The Rizal Microprocessor, named in honor of Dr. Jose Rizal, will be a multi-platform embedded microprocessor configurable for various applications, devices, and systems. BIT also will offer practical training in device and system level firmware and software development.

The Institute is a project spearheaded by BiTMICRO Networks, a solid-state storage company based in Silicon Valley, its Philippine subsidiary BiTMICRO Networks International Inc., and both companies’ founders, the Bruce brothers, who were all originally from the Philippines.

“The Philippines’ traction in the global microelectronics industry is almost entirely concentrated in assembly, fabrication, and manufacturing,” says Rey Bruce. “BiTMICRO is practically the only Filipino founded and owned company engaging into actual microchip design and engineering.”

“We hope to eventually build a critical mass of locally developed engineers that can make the Philippines a favored destination of the world’s best microelectronic design companies,” adds Rudy Bruce, president of BIT.

Graduate and undergraduate engineering students from partner universities are invited to participate. The initial list of participating schools includes the University of the Philippines, Mapua Institute of Technology, First Asia Institute of Technology and Humanities, Don Bosco Technical College, and Mindanao State University.

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