Microelectronics thermal management device from Nextreme meets MIL STD 883 shock standard

DURHAM, N.C., 14 Oct. 2009. An advanced heat-pumping thermoelectric device for electronics thermal management from Nextreme Thermal Solutions in Durham, N.C., has passed the 3000-G shock test as defined in the MIL STD 883E method 2002 mechanical shock standard, Nextreme officials say.

Oct 14th, 2009

DURHAM, N.C., 14 Oct. 2009. An advanced heat-pumping thermoelectric device for electronics thermal management from Nextreme Thermal Solutions in Durham, N.C., has passed the 3000-G shock test as defined in the MIL STD 883E method 2002 mechanical shock standard, Nextreme officials say.

The Nextreme OptoCooler HV14 module can create a maximum temperature differential of as much as 60 degrees Celsius between its hot and cold sides with a zero heat load. The OptoCooler is suitable for cooling electronic and electro-optical devices such as laser diodes, avalanche photodiodes, and bright LEDs.

The OptoCooler HV14 is designed to operate at standard electrical power requirements. At 85 C the electronics cooling device operates at a maximum voltage of 2.7 volts and can pump 1.5 Watts of heat in a footprint of 3 square millimeters.

MIL-STD 883E is a guide for screening microelectronic devices for aerospace and electronic applications. The shock test helps determine if devices can withstand severe shocks from physical blows or abrupt changes in motion.

"The use of thin films in conjunction with our semiconductor-based assembly process reduces the mass of our devices substantively," says Dave Koester, vice president of engineering at Nextreme. "Our thermoelectric coolers and power generation devices are inherently more resistant to shock and vibration than standard bulk devices while at the same time providing performance advantages."

For more information contact Nextreme online at www.nextreme.com/optocooler.

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-- Posted by John Keller, jkeller@pennwell.com. www.milaero.com.

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