Mil spec, rad hard solid state memory that resists space radiation introduced by Honeywell

PLYMOUTH, Minn., 31 July 2009. Radiation hardened electronics experts at Honeywell Aerospace in Plymouth, Minn., are introducing the HXSR06432 rad hard, mil spec solid state memory chip designed to resist the effects of space radiation that operates in the full military temperature range of -55 to 125 degrees Celsius and has radiation hardness of 1 megarad total dose.

PLYMOUTH, Minn., 31 July 2009.Radiation hardened electronics experts at Honeywell Aerospace in Plymouth, Minn., are introducing the HXSR06432 rad hard, mil specsolid state memory chip designed to resist the effects of space radiation that operates in the full military temperature range of -55 to 125 degrees Celsius and has radiation hardness of 1 megarad total dose.

The rad hard memory, which measures 1 by 1.2 square inches, is designed for use in low voltage systems operating in radiation sensitive environments, such as satellites, manned spacecraft, and high-performance medical devices. The memory chip can hold 64 million bits of digital data. The device meets MIL PRF 38535, QML class Q, and QML class V.

The 2,097,152 word by 32 bit multichip module (MCM) is a 64M bit static random access memory (SRAM) comes in a 2M x 32 configuration, and consists of four 512k nu 32 SRAM monolithic chips fabricated with Honeywell's 150-nanometer silicon-on-insulator CMOS (S150) technology. The RAM requires a core supply voltage of 1.8 +/-0.15 volts and an I/O supply voltage of 3.3 ± 0.3, or 2.5 ± 0.2 volts.

The device consumes less than 400 milliwatts typical power at 40 MHz operation. The SRAM is asynchronous with a typical access time of 13 nanoseconds at 3.3 volts. A seven transistor (7T) memory cell is used for single event upset hardening, while four layer metal power busing and the low collection volume SOI substrate provide improved dose rate hardening.

The rad hard SRAM has reliability of one soft error bit every 150 years -- well in excess of the projected life cycle of virtually any spacecraft.

"This is the largest static memory device in the space market," says David Wick, director of microelectronic and sensor sales at Honeywell Aerospace. "It is based on proven silicon on insulator CMOS technology, and is made up of four die of previous proven product. It does not latch up, and the memory cells do not get stuck."

For more information contact Honeywell Aerospace online at www.honeywell.com.

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