General Dynamics builds 130 armored vehicles for Marine Corps

STERLING HEIGHTS, Mich., 3 Feb. 2006. General Dynamics Land Systems has received a $128 million increment of a $257 million contract for 130 new eight-wheeled Light Armored Vehicles (LAV-A2) in various configurations for the U.S. Marine Corps.

Feb 3rd, 2006

STERLING HEIGHTS, Mich., 3 Feb. 2006. General Dynamics Land Systems has received a $128 million increment of a $257 million contract for 130 new eight-wheeled Light Armored Vehicles (LAV-A2) in various configurations for the U.S. Marine Corps.

The contract has a total potential value of $307 million if a $50 million option for electric turret drives is exercised.

The LAV-A2 variants are an improved version of the Marines' Light Armored Vehicle series which entered service in the 1980s and continues operational employment today.

General Dynamics will deliver armored personnel, anti-tank, command & control, logistic, and mortar variants beginning in July 2007. Work will be performed by existing General Dynamics employees in London, Ontario, Canada; Sterling Heights, Mich.; and Woodbridge, Va. Work is expected to be complete by July 2008.

The Light Armored Vehicle A2 provides the Marine Corps' Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion a mobile, agile and survivable system for conducting offensive and defensive operations in support of the Marine Air-Ground Task Force. The eight-wheeled amphibious armored vehicle is equipped with an improved suspension, is fitted for enhanced armor protection and features an automatic fire suppression system for crew protection. Power is provided by a Detroit Diesel 6V53T diesel engine developing 275 horsepower coupled to an Allison MT653, 6 speed (5 forward, 1 reverse) automatic transmission. The four rear wheels drive the vehicle on a full-time basis, but eight-wheel drive is selectable.

General Dynamics, headquartered in Falls Church, Va., employs approximately 72,200 people worldwide and had 2005 revenue of $21.2 billion. The company is a market leader in mission-critical information systems and technologies; land and expeditionary combat systems, armaments and munitions; shipbuilding and marine systems; and business aviation. For more information, see www.generaldynamics.com.

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