Remote vapor sampler detects airborne chemicals

NEWBURY PARK, Calif., 7 March 2005. Electronic Sensor Technology, Inc. announced today that it has developed a remote vapor sampling interface for its popular portable handheld zNose analyzer.

Mar 8th, 2005

NEWBURY PARK, Calif., 7 March 2005. Electronic Sensor Technology, Inc. announced today that it has developed a remote vapor sampling interface for its popular portable handheld zNose analyzer.

The existing zNose Model 4200 is a portable gas chromatograph that can capture and analyze any odor, fragrance, or chemical vapor within 10 seconds. Capitalizing on the new interface, the company has also developed a miniaturized handheld remote vapor sampler as an accessory product to the zNose. The remote sampler is truly handheld, weights less than two pounds, and uses two D-cell batteries to power a small air pump to sample ambient air at 750 liters per minute.

Volatile organic compounds within ambient air are collected in small, removable cartridges. Those samples captured at remote locations can be quickly analyzed onsite when a user inserts the cartridges into a zNose interface.

Electronic Sensor Technology plans to begin manufacturing the remote samplers for a broad array of applications including chemical profiling of cargo containers and for monitoring of border locations, airports, subways, and other public facilities for homeland security.

"Security solutions today require the flexibility to function under any environment," said Edward J. Staples, Electronic Sensor Technology's CEO. "By developing miniaturized vapor samplers which interface with the zNose, we are able to provide detection and analysis of chemical vapors in areas where discretion may be warranted or a venue's size may not support one of our larger devices. We believe this smaller unit will expand the market for zNose even further."

Founded in 1995, Electronic Sensor Technology has developed and patented a breakthrough chemical vapor analysis process. The company's product line is positioned to eliminate key vulnerabilities in the homeland security market, specifically in commercial building HVAC security, maritime port security, airport security, and border security. Many of the Homeland Security initiatives have greatly increased the need to develop fast and accurate methods of detecting and identifying a broad range of terrorist threats. These markets are predicted to grow at rapid rates as a result of increasing government and private sector concern with present security levels. For more information, see www.znose.com.

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