Safran wins Army job to build next-generation electro-optical Laser Target Locator Module II

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md., 15 July 2016. U.S. Army land warfare experts are asking electro-optics engineers at Safran Optics 1 Inc. in Bedford, N.H., to build the Army's next-generation laser target locator.

Safran wins Army job to build next-generation electro-optical Laser Target Locator Module II
Safran wins Army job to build next-generation electro-optical Laser Target Locator Module II
ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md., 15 July 2016. U.S. Army land warfare experts are asking electro-optics engineers at Safran Optics 1 Inc. in Bedford, N.H., to build the Army's next-generation laser target locator.

Officials of the Army Contracting Command at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., announced a $304.5 million contract to Safran this week to build the Laser Target Locator Module II (LTLM II). A laser target locator enables foot soldiers identify target locations in daylight or at night, as well as in obscured-visibility such as fog or smoke.

The LTLM II is a lightweight handheld laser target locator with a color day camera and night sight, and a selective availability anti-spoof module (SAASM) Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver.

The LTLM II is to be smaller and more affordable than previous laser targeting systems, such as the lightweight handheld Laser Target Locator Module (LTLM), which is being manufactured by the BAE Systems Electronic Systems segment in Hudson, N.H.

The Army awarded BAE Systems a $23 million contract to the provide the LTLM in February 2012. The company is providing the company's Target Reconnaissance Infra-Red Geolocating Rangefinder, or TRIGR, which helps soldiers determine target coordinates quickly and accurately.

Related: Army chooses BAE Systems for handheld LTLM for target recognition in daylight and darkness

For LTLM II, however, Army officials say weight is an crucial factor. The goal for this next-generation laser rangefinder is to reduce the system's size, weight and power consumption while decreasing its cost.

Among the laser targeting products from Safran is the company's Handheld Precision Targeting Device (HHPTD) -- a lightweight, multi-functional, integrated sensor that provides accurate target coordinates for precision target engagement.

The multispectral device delivers precision target coordinates by using several north-finding solutions and displays a 90-percent target location error measurement in the bi-ocular eyepiece, Safran officials say.

The field-proven HHPTD system provides precision target measurements and long-range observation capability in day or night and under all-weather environments.

Safran prevailed in the competition to build the LTLM II system over four other bidders. For more information contact Safran Optics 1 online at www.optics1.com or the Army Contracting Command-Aberdeen at http://acc.army.mil/contractingcenters/acc-apg.

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