Atlantis Astronauts use Ball Aerospace's WFC3 and COS aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope

BOULDER, Colo., 26 May 2009. Astronauts for NASA's STS-125 servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) installed two science instruments built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. during their 13-day mission, They also completed critical repairs to two previously installed Ball science instruments.

BOULDER, Colo., 26 May 2009. Astronauts for NASA's STS-125 servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) installed two science instruments built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. during their 13-day mission, They also completed critical repairs to two previously installed Ball science instruments.

Space Shuttle Atlantis and its crew of seven landed at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., on Sunday, May 24.

The Wide Field Camera 3 was installed during the first spacewalk on May 14, and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph was installed on the third spacewalk, on May 16.

Wide Field is being used to take images in the ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared portions of the spectrum while COS will help scientists better understand the universe's cosmic web by gathering information from the ultraviolet light from distant objects, reveals a representative.

"The exceptional work performed by NASA's STS-125 astronauts during the long awaited servicing mission to Hubble is a reminder of what makes the U.S. space program great," says David L. Taylor, president and CEO of Ball Aerospace.

During the STS-125 mission astronauts made unprecedented on-orbit repairs to the ACS and STIS instruments and also replaced batteries and gyroscopes to extend the life of HST, continues a representative. NASA anticipates that the new HST instruments and repairs will keep Hubble operational until the James Webb Space Telescope joins it on orbit in 2014.

As the principal subcontractor for the Webb, Ball Aerospace has been working since 2003 to build the Webb's advanced optical system.

More in Power