FAA trains controllers with Lockheed Martin simulator

ROCKVILLE, Md., 30 August 2005. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) completed training its first class of student air traffic controllers using its new Initial Academy Training System (IATS).

Aug 30th, 2005

ROCKVILLE, Md., 30 August 2005. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) completed training its first class of student air traffic controllers using its new Initial Academy Training System (IATS).

The FAA, along with Lockheed Martin, built the IATS system to provide a high-fidelity training simulation lab for new students preparing to become en route air traffic controllers. The FAA started using the system at the FAA Academy in Oklahoma City more than four months ahead of schedule.

IATS uses actual air traffic controller display consoles driven by the standard National Airspace System software in use at the Air Route Traffic Control Centers (ARTCCs) to provide a realistic training environment for the students.

Integrated with the consoles is a host simulation subsystem that not only allows presentation of realistic, identical training sectors and exercises to all students simultaneously, but also allows each student to independently control the sector airspace without interference from the other students. The system allows students and instructors to start a scenario, as well as record, pause, rewind and replay it for further reinforcement of the concepts they learn. The scenario simulator provides radar and inter-facility inputs, as well as "ghost pilot" stations that respond to student directives. A voice simulation system allows students to communicate with pilots and other controllers through standard headsets.

The FAA developed the scenario simulation and voice simulation subsystems, while Lockheed Martin and major subcontractor Sunhillo Corp., of Berlin, N.J., provided the host and display subsystems, as well as system installation, integration, and test.

"This technology solution demonstrated a true team effort between the FAA and its industry partners, from development to implementation," said Sue Corcoran, Lockheed Martin's vice president of Aviation Solutions. "Lockheed Martin is very proud to help the FAA Academy meet its aggressive controller training goals, enabling the new controllers to get the best training possible."

Learning the basics on IATS will result in student air traffic controllers being better prepared to continue their training upon arrival to their assigned ARTCC, significantly decreasing the amount of time required for on-the-job training. IATS is a key system for enabling the FAA to hire and train new controllers to replace the large number of retiring controllers over the next several years.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin employs about 130,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture and integration of advanced technology systems, products and services. The corporation reported 2004 sales of $35.5 billion. For more information, see www.lockheedmartin.com.

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