Increased airborne surveillance needed for Asia Pacific

PALO ALTO, Calif., 10 July 2008. The Asia Pacific region features two vital sea trade routes that present unique security challenges, say analysts at Frost & Sullivan. Improved airborne surveillance would help counter increasing threats. With the rising need for better technology in radar, electro-optics/infrared (EO/IR) sensors, and next-generation aircrafts, growth potential exists for defense contractors to showcase their capabilities to Asia Pacific's armed forces.

Jul 10th, 2008

PALO ALTO, Calif., 10 July 2008. The Asia Pacific region features two vital sea trade routes that present unique security challenges, say analysts in the Aerospace & Defense Group at Frost & Sullivan in Palo Alto, Calif. Improved airborne surveillance for this area would enable fast responses to counter increasing threats, such as hijacking and illegal trafficking.

With the rising need for better technology in radar, electro-optics/infrared (EO/IR) sensors, and next-generation aircrafts, growth potential exists for defense contractors to showcase their capabilities to Asia Pacific's armed forces.

"Information from C2ISR mission-capable airborne platforms improves situational awareness and enables commanding officers to make the right decisions," observes Frost & Sullivan research analyst Chern Wai Cheong. "However, ongoing military procurement programs in this region have undoubtedly triggered concerns about the balance of power between neighboring countries. In order to achieve a balance, the armed forces of these countries should turn their focus towards working together to combat these threats."

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