Goal of predictive maintenance centers on software, computers, and sensors to record sounds and vibration

Researchers develop systems that can predict when maintenance issues could be making an engine run a bit too hot, a bit too loud or vibrate too much.

Predictive Analysis 31 May 2019

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Trucking maintenance software developed with help from the Pentagon soon may be able to predict engine trouble long before it happens, as sensors and software become more advanced, experts said. Transport Topics reports. Continue reading original article

The Military & Aerospace Electronics take:

31 May 2019 -- Research being conducted for the Pentagon is advancing this goal predictive maintenance, as a government research affiliate is working to develop systems that can predict when maintenance issues could be making an engine run a bit too hot, a bit too loud or vibrate a bit too much.

Those subtle changes produce data that can be analyzed and used to head off trouble, said Abdel-Moez E. Bayoumi, a professor of mechanical engineering who has been working on diagnosing the mechanical problems of military aircraft through a program at the University of South Carolina for 20 years. His Pentagon subjects for recording indications like sounds and vibration include the Boeing AH-64 Apache helicopter and the Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey.

His task: Instead of planning maintenance by the calendar — or by mechanical crisis — find ways to predict trouble before it happens. In particular, figure out how to maintain engines and equipment in a manner more efficient and effective than routine inspections.

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John Keller, chief editor
Military & Aerospace Electronics

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